#4 Just a Kyle kind of Langford


#3795

I’m a big Ambrose fan as a lockdown but needs to develop more strings to his bow in being more attacking as the team grows next year. I think He, Hartley and Gleek could be usurped if Francis form demands it at VFL level. His natural ability trumps the preceding 3 by a fair margin…its just the that tank.


#3796

Danger is selfish, Dusty all day for me.


#3797

I still think he’s a lead-up forward who has a solid pair of hands.

But I really want to be proven wrong


#3798

But Danger is a top bloke though, just ask him.


#3799

Very few teams would be playing an only 191cm lead up fwd unless they have some unbelievable standout qualities.

Stringer - pace/strength. Tom Lynch - endurance

Being a fwd is tough so you need the tricks to be able to be able to beat not only your man, but multiple at times.

Not to say he isn’t still reasonably effective as a forward but I’m not sure he had the tricks. Coaching group didn’t seem to think so either hence his planned development as a mid where they see he has the skill set to excel.

Many a fwd at junior level who is that in between size will need to likely transition to midfield at AFL level if they can. Should work in their favour though as more versatile.


#3800

Geez I hope you are correct with this post.


#3801

one of his major flaw…if he eradicates that he will be a way better player


#3802

Honestly I don’t think it will change until he’s exposed, properly, to AFL pace. He’s good enough at VFL level that he can search for that better option more often than not. At AFL level, just that little bit tighter & quicker, can’t get away with it.
Remember how often Jobe used to turn it over like that? 06 ish? Heaps.


#3803

Yep, no way to know till the big kids stuff starts.

All I can say is that his earlier Ressies mid time saw him still wait too long, or try to use his size to break tackles.(and lose balance / control)
Later in the season this was less apparent.
Hopefully it means he’s learning and implementing.

He also took a few more simpler options when under pressure, though this may be because he had better options / understanding nearby.(eg Begley bursting past)

In that sense he’s a bit like Myers - if he can get his hands on it in traffic AND there are good options to feed it to they’re both much better players.
Langford to Stringer or Smith, with Zach lurking out the back.
Bring it on.


#3804

Surely you are kidding.

If danger had zerrets foot skills he wouldbe one of the greatest players of all time.

Zerret is elite at kicking the ball back in the corridor in the middle of the ground. It’s the most difficult and dangerous kick in the game and the bloke Nails it so often.

Dangerfield can only dream of even attempting these passes.


#3805

Oh yes, I was kidding, that’s right.


#3806

The Langford’s birthday is a factor in how confident and vocal he currently isn’t.

Believe it or not, this is supported strongly by internationally replicated research, read on …

Just quoting from @Scorch 's Training 12/1/18 post which got me thinking of some things I read a while back:

Langford did some very good things, lifting his arms at stoppages and moving through traffic on
a few occasions in the sim was great .Not by any means dominant though and much quieter than the other mids (as had been the case all week) In a possession drill inside 50 (cafe side) he was as quiet as a mouse when requesting the footy… Just put his hand in the air… I get the feeling that he doesn’t believe that he can change the course of a game yet which means he’s reluctant to scream for the footy, and is awfully ‘nice’ at stoppages. The irony is that he has the gifts… Showed in a number of drills what a great kick he is, and he looks quicker… Leaves me wondering if he really wants it

Statistically an important factor in Langfords attitude is his birthday.

Kyle Langford DOB 01-12-1996

The month of your birth influences your chances of becoming a professional sportsperson, an Australian researcher has found.

Senior research fellow Dr. Adrian Barnett from Queensland University of Technology’s Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation studies the seasonal patterns of population health and found the month you were born in could influence your future health and fitness. The results of the study are published in the Springer book Analysing Seasonal Health Data¹, by Barnett, co-authored by researcher Professor Annette Dobson from the University of Queensland.

Barnett analysed the birthdays of professional Australian Football League (AFL) players and found a disproportionate number had their birthdays in the early months of the year, while many fewer were born in the later months, especially December.

The Australian school year begins in January. “Children who are taller have an obvious advantage when playing the football code of AFL,” Dr. Barnett said. “If you were born in January, you have almost 12 months’ growth ahead of your classmates born late in the year, so whether you were born on December 31st or January 1st could have a huge effect on your life.”

Dr. Barnett found there were 33 percent more professional AFL players than expected with birthdays in January and 25 percent fewer in December. He said the results mirrored other international studies which found a link between being born near the start of school year and the chances of becoming a professional player in the sports of ice hockey, football, volleyball and basketball.

"Research in the UK shows those born at the start of the school year also do better academically and have more confidence," he said. “And with physical activity being so important, it could also mean smaller children get disheartened and play less sport. If smaller children are missing out on sporting activity then this has potentially serious consequences for their health in adulthood.”

Dr. Barnett said this seasonal pattern could also result in wasted talent, with potential sports stars not being identified because they were competing against children who were much more physically advanced than them. He said a possible solution was for one of the sporting codes in Australia to change the team entry date from January 1st to July 1st.

I also think Stringer’s arrival in the midfield training group and his performance as a midfield bull could also be a factor in keeping Langford in his shell given he doesn’t have the swag of Stringer and tends to introversion. For the less confident, the more extroverted will usually be allowed to take over and they will be looked to more readily to initiate action.

The answer to Langford’s confidence and becoming a more extroverted player may be found in Richmond’s success. The whole team used mindfulness meditation last year to learn how to focus on replicating the mindset of when they were at their best in terms of sports performance and learning how to keep in that zone, rather than being as dependant on those around them and the situation they were in to determine how they feel.

I believe this was a big factor in their ability to perform when it mattered last year. Dustin Martin was one of the first players at Richmond who was using mindfulness meditation and the effect it had on his performance and attitude lead to the whole team using it. There is a fair bit in the media on this, and on the radio this morning at ~9am the woman who taught this to the Richmond team is on SEN talking about it if you are interested.

I think this would be good for the whole team, but to get the most out of the less confident players with lots of ability, like Langford, I think it is a no brainer.


#3807

Or, the ones that make it have strived and struggled harder and longer.


#3808

That is the biggest tin foil hat load of sh*t I’ve heard in a while


#3809

[quote=“SCarey, post:3806, topic:2084, full:true”]
**The Langford’s birthday is a factor

The month of your birth influences your chances of becoming a professional sportsperson, an Australian researcher has found.
Barnett analysed the birthdays of professional Australian Football League (AFL) players and found a disproportionate number had their birthdays in the early months of the year, while many fewer were born in the later months, especially December.

The Australian school year begins in January. “Children who are taller have an obvious advantage when playing the football code of AFL,” Dr. Barnett said. "If you were born in January, you have almost 12 months’ growth ahead of your classmates born late in the year

As my partner is a scientist I have a bit of an eye for scientific fallacies.
Victorian School Starting Age.
A child must be 5 by April 30th to start Primary School that year. They must be enrolled before they are 6.

So a significant number of Victorian kids, and therefore potential AFL players, with birthdays in the first 4 months of the year will either be the the oldest, OR the youngest & smallest in their cohort.

Therefore the oldest, biggest kids in any school year on average, in Victoria will be born in May, June, July.
If this academic research was statistically targeted at AFL players, and the thesis true, that’s what you’d expect to find, given the percent of Victorian AFL players.

Unfortunately I expect it was Queensland biased - they have different school starting regs.
( A bit like all the scientific studies & trials based on white Americans only)

So nice try by Dr Barnet, but it doesn’t excuse Langford being quiet.

(And For the non-scientific horoscope wise December produces extroverted, over-confident and pig headed types)


#3810

A pity it’s based on facts. The bit about statistically December birthdays are underrepresented in the AFL at least.

It is true in baseball too, except in the US, they take the ages from the 1st of July instead of 1st of January as they do with age group junior comps with Aussie Rules.

Statistically there are significantly less MLB players born in June.

I’ll dig up the research later on when I have some time. It is reasonable to infer that the relative experience of success of the older kids experience in junior comps carry over into senior sport and makes them relatively more confident.

Of course there are heaps of exceptions, but statistically it is one factor that has an influence on the relative confidence of one player compared to another.


#3811

Absolute load of sh*t sorry mate


#3812

What I want to know is, is he an only or second child?


#3813

Thanks for the apology. I would be interested in some actual reasoning behind your opinion. But I admit I have spotted a flaw in my own argument.

I do believe the stats are significant. But given Langford has made it to the AFL he has had relative success, so I probably am talking shiit.

What is probably more significant is we should give him one more years grace compared to older players in the same group, from a maturity point of view of nothing else.


#3814

Back in my cricket days, the cut-off date for each age group was October 1, and my birthday was early October.

So, for example, I would turn 14, but still be able to play Under 14’s that season, etc.

It was common for 16 year olds born in October, to be playing against 14 year olds born in September.

Needless to say, there was a clear advantage in that.