AFL - Good Ideas, Terrible Ideas, Too Many Ideas, No Idea


#2346

So… they want less congestion because there’s not enough goals… but they want to bring back in-the-back, because there’s too many goals.


#2347

Whenever I go back and watch 70s/80s games I’m struck by almost the complete opposite. Defenders went for the mark way, way, waaaay more, rarely opting to punch. (And almost no body contact prior to the actual contest).


#2348

They did go for their marks a lot more. Coaches weren’t terrified of losing possession then.

But ask Salmon or Lloyd about arm chopping.
And the good old fashioned accidental punch to the back of the scone too! :grin:


#2349

Finally, making it way more open to umpire interpretation, just what the game needs.


#2350

Luke Hodge kept the fire burning on that one.

I’m going to say, purely anecdotally, 70s/80s footballers were leaner and more focussed on running, 90s was when players were at their heaviest and strongest.
That’s when the grapple/wrestle really got off the hook, everyone trying to copy Silvagni.

It’s tilted back towards running again in the last 10 or so.


#2351

Nailed it - This is the worst rule brought into footy - I was brought up that you punch the arms if you can’t punch the ball - It’s even more ridiculous when you punch the ball clearly and then are penalised if you make incidental contact to the arms in the aftermath.


#2352

The below the knees contact trumps it as the worst rule ever. Fair enough if you slide in legs first but to be on the ground and get punished for trying to get the ball goes against the very spirit of the game


#2353

The ruck ‘rules’ is what grind my gears, ruckman being punished for good play is made worse by random free kicks that confuse everyone


#2354

I agree, but I do like that it makes guys keep their feet going for the footy.

The arm choking has been ridiculous, it has made average marking players look way better than they are. It will make players who are not strong overhead struggle.

Daniher is going to love being able to stiff arm guys under the footy with a hand in the back.


#2355

Sure, but a softening of the arm chop rule will cost him a lot more


#2356

Just further on the arm chop rule, if they soften that they will make it seriously difficult for forwards to take contested marks in the forward line. Forwards rarely compete one on one any more, if the third man up can just come in and take the arms out it will be a nonsense frankly.

This strikes me as a move to find some sugar for the fans by dealing with things that were negatively received originally in the hope that it will distract from the other nonsense they’re trying to push through.

It’s misguided in my view.


#2357

Has anyone ever stopped watching AFL because of a rule change?

Ban my club from the finals - I’m angry but I’ll keep on watching.

Extend the goal square by 9m - sir, you’ve gone too far!


#2358

fixed…

The AFL is completely unaware


#2359

I haven’t watched a single non-EFC game since they stitched us up.

Edit: nor spent a cent in merchandise, and even turned down invitations to see EFC games in WA live. I now use my rare spare time more wisely.

Fark the AFL.


#2360

Same


#2361

“We’re bringing in a 90 metre goal square, first touch out of bounds, a conference draw system, and raising the price of tickets 200%.”

“Oh, and we’re abolishing the Gold Coast Suns.”


#2362

I have watched Anzac Day each year, Essendon never seem to turn up… does that count?


#2363

Ouch.


#2364

AFL to introduce mid-season rookie draft in 2019

4 October 2018 — 3:57pm

By Michael Gleeson & Peter Ryan

A mid-season rookie draft will be introduced to the AFL in 2019 for players overlooked in drafts or previously on a club list who choose to renominate for the rookie draft.

The change will give clubs more opportunity to tweak their lists up until the start of the season with the AFL hoping the changes will improve competitiveness.

A memo sent to clubs has informed them of the change, with the AFL also set to allow clubs to add a player to their rookie list during the pre-season if they lose a player to a long-term injury or retirement.

Under that clause clubs will be able to add a new player to the rookie list between December 1 and March 15 by placing a player on one of three inactive lists: a long-term injury list, a season-ending list or a retired player list.

The mid-season rookie draft will only be available to clubs that have a spare rookie position available.

They can then add a rookie player from that draft. The club has that player for the remainder of the year and has first right on them at the end of the season.

To be picked up as a rookie, a player has to have been through a national draft previously.

If the rule had been in place this season, Collingwood’s Tyson Goldsack may have been placed on the season-ending list and replaced with a rookie player, making his return impossible.

However it would also have allowed Carlton to find a replacement for Sam Docherty, who suffered a season-ending injury in the pre-season.

On the flip side, had there been a rookie draft in place this year, clubs with a bad run of injuries such as West Coast, GWS or Collingwood could have gone to the rookie draft looking for replacements.

It would be likely that a player like Werribee’s Sam Collins could have been picked up to play if he had chosen to nominate and considered it in his interests to do so.

Similarly Mitch Brown was a star in the amateurs for St Kevin’s and could have been sought as a proven talent able to fill a role for the year.

How to handle the contract implications for players at state league clubs is still to be clarified.


#2365

oh god, Trade Radio in the middle of the farking season