Bitcoin, and other tulips


#786

Thank you.


#787

this is the train of thought i just don’t understand about the other side. i’ve been on about it alot lately, and i’ll stop, cos my replying contradicts my words about not caring that much.

but it seems that the regular stock market guys look down on crypto markets like their market is the bees knees and has no risk associated to it.

crypto is what it is, it may crash, just like the regular stock market has and does and will continue to do.
it may be a bubble, just like the regular stock market suffers from.

people are operating scams just to steal your money, sound familiar ?
people are stealing your money from your wallet, just like they do in real life.

It seems to me that all the reasons as to why the regular sotck market guys point out crypto is a massive massive risk, is the exact same reasons the regular one is.

the only difference i see is, ain’t nobody getting rich by commissions in crypto ( well not in the strictest sense, prolly in other ways) while wall street is handing out how many billions and billions in bonus’s for selling people ■■■■■■ stock and trades, just so they can pump up their numbers ?

i get what crypto is, it’s a massive massive risk, even if you do a a ■■■■ ton of research and the like.
but it seems the opposite side of the fence is throwing stones from a glass house type setup to me.


#788

Reddit has that for almost anything.


#789

Hella nice storm in Singapore. Five centimetre flows over everything are fun, the first time, if you’re wearing shorts and sandals. Also, unlike most tulips, after said storms are gone they also leave the place a lot more pleasant.

(Will bring the poncho out the next two days, though, not just the umbrella…)


#790

Top 90.


#791

#792

And there is half the problem with people starting out, they want to be near the city, they want the lifestyle. they want the restaurants and coffee shops and all the luxuries, Basically they want the lifestyle their parents have and have worked for over 40 years and they want it now,
Our first residence was a one bedroom flat in Murrumbeena and cost a weeks wage for a toolmaker. Lived on the smell of an oily rag and got a mortgage of $78 week to build a house in the foothills on a block of land we had bought from our savings before marriage. Had to save $3,000 in 9 months with the promise we would save $500 in the next month before the bank would give us that mortgage and we only got it because my wife had a constant savings history of 6 years.
The house was 15 minutes drive from the first suburb and my wife had to travel for 1 hour 15M to get to the city, the house had no gardens, pathways, curtains or light fitting no public transport (buses or trams).
These days you can buy a fully fitted house adjoining Melton for $330,000 and you get $15,000 first home buyers grant.

You want in, you make sacrifices.


#793

Big day on the markets.
Check out my fat wallet.
5 cent profit on my portfolio now, mofos.

Edit: Wait, now it’s 2 cents…


#794

How is your cool indie coin that nobody has ever heard of going? Are you gonna be able to say you were into pac before they were famous?

Is it worth a look?


#795

How much snow did you have to walk through to get to school?


#796

NO.

It’s just a bit of fun and I have no idea what I’m doing.
And if anyone lost money because of something I said I’d feel really bad.
There are lots and lots of coins.


#797

Posts like this ■■■■ me. I saw a stat the other day, with inflation, a house that cost 87k in 1987, is only the equivilent of approx 170k today. I can’t for the life of me remember where, or I would post the link. House prices are through the roof, and it’s not solely due to natural inflation. Your comments about lifestyle are ridiculous. It basically comes down to people not wanting a mortgage for 30 plus years, just so they don’t have to live up shitcreek, over an hour away from their work place. But yeah, damn youngsters wanting the “lifestyle” their parents had :face_with_raised_eyebrow:


#798

But you do have no idea what it all means, don’t care, and are happy anyway… yeah?


#799

Just transferred all my super into it, appreciate the advice.

Nah, I just mean… Has it moved? And where do you get it, it’s not on Coinspot?


#800

Were very lucky we don’t have the lifestyle my parents had. 17% interest rates are never fun…


#801

Tip toe through the tulips…


#802

One of my favourite sketches too.

I grew up 3km from here, guess how far it is from the CBD?

1L4fac8dea-d8f2-4de8-8212-7b3e8aee39ec

Love interacting with smug young ■■■■■ who have NFI.

By the way the top photo is the best house in the street.


#803

15k for a house in maidstone in 1975. inflation to 2016 puts it at ~100k.

market value now? 1m+.

sacrifices made when your working class shithole suburb is now where people want to be.


#804

Little things like 1 in 10 blocks to be left vacant for children to play on, despotic council rules that demand what type of curtains you can have or plans on how the garden is planted.
Government greed, avg. house $48k state, got federal, land development charges on rezoning $1 million per hectare in advance even if it will be 10 years in the future (market garden at Officer) and then there is GST

And the biggy, demand and supply, with an additional 250,000 people coming into the country plus natural increase the pressure on housing prices is enormous. With immigrants they have to live somewhere and the government doesn’t care how much they spend to house them.


#805

OK. Would you mind telling this smug young **** with NFI two things:

  1. What should house prices grow at in the very long term (a percentage or a relationship to other economic variable would be fine); and
  2. In response to another post below you omitted interest rates in your opinion as to why house prices have risen considerably faster than inflation. Do you think there’s no causal connection between the two?