Climate Change in Australia


#5089

How odd you should quote it to try and justify your position in the first place then.


#5090

If they are stupid enough to put the information out there, I will use it unlike the BOM who refuse to make any readings, adjustments to data or methodology public in case it can be used against them.


#5091

I’m not sure how you can predict the future like that, but with the increase in investments in power storage and more forms of renewable energy, in ten years time it’s reasonable to suggest the power grid will be in the best condition it’s ever been in.
There will be no reliance on outdated coal supplies.

As for wind power, we know that it’s not a constant form of energy supply, that’s why it’s one of many renewable sources.


#5092

Shortest day sunrise 7:35am sunset 5:07pm, panels useless for 2 hours after sunrise and 2 hours before sunset and sweet bugger all if it is cloudy/ raining.

i have a 5Kw system and on one magnificent Melbourne day it generated a whopping 383 watts.


#5093

I have a 5kw inverter with 6kw of panels, oversized deliberately to maximise those dull days.
On a sunny day I’ll get 5kw over the midday period, (say for about 3 hours or so) and over a whole day, the best I’ve obtained is 43.5kw.

Seriously, you should be getting much, much more than you are. Do they need a clean and / or service?


#5094

He gets plenty.
He’s already boasted about getting such a good deal and called everyone idiots about it.

Don’t bother.


#5095

ok ta. I’ve missed those posts.

Being wrong about stuff is one thing, but deliberately lying is another.

I wont bother.


#5096

Best move. Ignore the troll.


#5097

In fairness, he was talking about the yield on a midwinter day. How much does your system get then?


#5098

Brilliant article


#5099

Ha! I didn’t realise “one magnificent Melbourne day” was so laced with sarcasm! My bad!

My worst day was in July when I got 3.9kw.


#5100

Wow, go out for a few hours and captain Velcro opens a whole can of stupid!


#5101

Don’t sound surprised.
You’re talking about someone in his last days fretting about the economic future of this country (and, apparently, Germany) that he’ll never live to see, and makes 99% of his posts in the Climate Change thread.
The other one percent, if that, are still about climate change but in a different thread.
Like friggin’ Space.
And he does all this on a football website.

It’s got way beyond right or wrong and well into the realms of sad.


#5102

big%20hoax


#5103


#5104

True.

In effect, the still longed for Holy Grail of Fusion power, has actually already been with us for a few decades now. :smirk:


#5105

RIP to the Bramble Cay Melomys, australia’s first extinction caused entirely and unambiguously by climate change. Official listing as ‘extinct’ buried in the depths of a dept of environment press release today.

Lived solely on one low-lying Torres Strait island. Sea level rise has meant that the island is now regularly washed over by waves in high seas. Not a good place to be a little mousy-type critter.


#5106

Scott Morrison could use the Emissions Reduction Fund, the centrepiece of his climate policy, to finance a coal- burning power station… the leading cause OF emissions.

Yep, you read it right.

There is nothing this coal-obsessed government won’t do to avoid meaningful action on climate change.

Greenpeace


#5107

Mt Gellibrand wind farm to help power Geelong oil refinery
By Sophie Vorrath on February 19, 2019

Geelong fuel refiner and retailer Viva Energy will source around one-third of its annual energy needs from locally generated renewables, through a power purchase agreement with one of Victoria’s largest wind farms, the 132MW Mt Gellibrand.

Viva – which supplies around one-quarter of Australia’s liquid fuel needs, and is the exclusive licensee of Shell in Australia – said on Tuesday that it had signed a PPA with the wind farm’s owner operator, Acciona, to source around 100GWh of electricity a year, for an undisclosed price.

The two companies said the off-take deal, while only announced this week, was secured and underway in January – supplying the Corio refinery with wind power from the nearby Mt Gellibrand, where the first of 44 turbines started spinning last June.

In a statement on Tuesday, Viva Energy chief Scott Wyatt said access to reliable and affordable electricity was critical for the refinery’s operations.

“Over the last few years the cost of electricity supply in Victoria has more than doubled and has become increasingly subject to pricing spikes due to weather and reliability events causing disruptions to generation and supply,” he said.

“Our research has shown that renewable energy is very competitive with existing sources of generation and can be a viable and sustainable part of the energy mix for a business like ours.

“This agreement with Acciona is a win-win outcome for us both as it helps lock in a stable electricity price over the long term, while supporting a local renewable energy source not far from the refinery.”

Acciona Energy Australia managing director Brett Wickham also welcomed the PPA.

“Companies like Viva Energy understand the value alternative energy supply solutions, such as this wind-backed corporate PPA, offer in reducing electricity price volatility and costs,” he said.

Construction of Acciona’s $258 million Mt Gellibrand wind farm was fast-tracked in 2017 through an early Andrews government tender designed to reboot renewables investment in the state, and side-step a capital strike by major utilities.

At a turning of the sod ceremony at the wind farm’s site in April 2017, Acciona managing director Andrew Thomson said the company expected to see Mt Gellibrand “pouring” clean energy into the grid within about 15 months, it time for booming demand for renewable power generation.

– One has to love the irony of a renewables facility powering an oil refinery! :sunglasses:


#5108

But that cannot be correct because @sorfed said that Wind Power is totally unreliable and just doesn’t work, and I reckon he must know better than 97% of scientists and those imbeciles who run large successful corporations.