Health & Fitness


#841

Keyhole surgery less days. Overnight stay in hospital, small scar.

You will experience a little tightness inside for a day or two around the repair spot, but after that all will be good. If you are going to have an operation, this is a good one with little discomfort and no other dramas.


#842

HI.

Im doing F45,very intense interval training.im 43.

Im doing close enough to one day on one day off because of the soreness. So 3 days a week.
My aim is weigh loss 10-12 kg.

Q- Am I better off doing 5 days at less intensity or 3 days going really hard?

Thx


#843

if you did less intensity you could do more consecutive days.
I would probably lean towards 3 days hard and go for a walk/swim/cycle on your easy days off.

But best to talk to f45 instructor and get their opinion as they would know your fitness and benefits of going every day, and also not to push you too hard if your doing consecutive days.


#844

Yeah its more about injury prevention too cheers m8


#845

Good to know, thanks mate.


#846

Did they say why they wanted to operate if you weren’t having any issues with it?


#847

Well Eastie, in my case, I was having a routline yearly checkup and in the prodding and poking by the Doc, he hit a sore spot, sent me off for tests and told me while it was minor and not troubling me, it could just split further one day in a hurry, which would make it critical.


#848

Interesting.
There’s a decent amount of research supporting conservative care, though obviously the Dr needs to take it on a case by case basis!


#849

The doctor pretty much told me to direct all my questions to the specialist but he implied that the only way to sort it out is to remove it by surgery, and the sooner, the better.


#850

From my understanding they basically surgically attach a piece of mesh over the site of herniation.
As I said before, often times they can remain asymptomatic for some time (as yours has) but the specialist should be able to determine whether it needs the operation or not (just make sure he’s not best mates with any surgeon he refers you to lol).


#851

See what the surgeon says & consider getting a second opinion.

And beware surgeons with short waiting times to be seen for non-urgent problems.


#852

@Eastie_Boi1 @langford thanks for the heads up, much appreciated.


#853

Missed breaking the sub-2hr marathon by 100 seconds. He took 1min 18 sec off the old record.
It’ll happen - but the pace he is running to do this is just crazily fast.

Marathon record ripped to shreds

  • By Ron Lewis
  • The Times
  • 11:55AM September 17, 2018

Two of the most gruelling world records in athletics fell within seven hours of each other yesterday as Eliud Kipchoge went within 100 seconds of running a sub-two-hour marathon in Berlin, before Kevin Mayer set five personal bests on the way to demolishing the world decathlon record at a small meeting in southern France.

Kipchoge, the Olympic champion, had long been called the greatest marathon runner of all time but, despite winning nine of his past ten marathons, the world record had eluded him until yesterday when he barely saw a rival before winning the Berlin Marathon in 2hr 1min 39 sec. It knocked 1min 18 sec off the previous record set by Dennis Kimetto, his fellow Kenyan, over the same course four years ago.

“I lack words to describe this day,” Kipchoge, 33, said. “It was hard. I ran my own race, I trusted my trainers, my programme and my coach. That’s what pushed me in the last kilometres.”

Berlin is popular for record-breaking attempts, thanks to a flat course, mild conditions and tall buildings shielding the runners from crosswinds. This was the seventh consecutive time that the men’s world record has been broken in this race. Kipchoge is the fifth Kenyan to break the world record.

This was not the fastest marathon he has run, though. Kipchoge, who won gold over 5,000m at the world championships aged 18 in 2003, ran the distance in 2:00:25 in May last year at the Monza motor racing track in Italy. It did not count as a recognised world record because drop-in, drop-out pacemakers were used for the complete distance.

In Berlin, Kipchoge started with three pacemakers but that number dropped to one by 15km, which he reached in 43:38. The final pacemaker, Josphat Boit, led Kipchoge through halfway in 1:01:06 before dropping out at 25km, covered in 1:12:24, leaving Kipchoge to run 17km alone.

Rather than drop the pace, Kipchoge accelerated. By the time he passed 40km in 1:55:32, the record looked a certainty. He finished nearly 4 and a half minutes in front of the second-placed runner, Amos Kipruto, a fellow Kenyan, who finished in 2:06:23, with Wilson Kipsang a further 25 seconds behind.

It was his third win in Berlin, having won his third London Marathon in April. His first attempt to break the world record had been three years ago in Berlin, when his trainers fell to pieces. He won the race despite the insoles of both shoes flapping around his ankles for most of the race.

Mayer recorded 9,126 points in the decathlon at Decastar in Talence, a suburb of Bordeaux, to beat the world record of Ashton Eaton by 81 points.

He had planned to be on holiday this month but that changed after a disaster at the European championships in Berlin last month where he set five outdoor personal bests in two days. The Frenchman, who won heptathlon gold at the world indoor championships in Birmingham in March, had been expected to win gold in Berlin, only to crash out of the competition in the second of ten events, the long jump, when he recorded three fouls.

Eaton, the American, dominated the decathlon for five years before retiring after winning his second Olympic gold medal at Rio de Janeiro in 2016. Mayer, 26, won silver in Rio before claiming gold at the world championships in London summer last year.

He had set numerous personal bests this year to indicate that a challenge to Eaton’s world record could be possible, although he had refused to consider it before the start of the competition in France. “As usual I am just focusing on doing my best in each event and not thinking about the final result,” he said.

Yet a strong first-day score of 4,563 points left him 140 points adrift of the tally Eaton managed when setting the world record at the world championships in Beijing in 2015.

Mayer’s performances yesterday were remarkable, as he set outdoor personal bests in the discus, pole vault and javelin to leave him needing to run within 30 seconds of his best in the 1,500m to set a record. He ran 13 seconds faster than his target.

“I’ve been waiting for this moment for a long time,” Mayer said. “We live for moments like this that are simply incredible. I couldn’t cry. I don’t have any more tears left because I was crying so much before the 1,500m.”

Eaton offered his congratulations via Twitter within seconds of Mayer crossing the finishing line.

“That was an incredible display of ability,” Eaton wrote. “I’m super happy for Kevin Mayer and even more for the future of the decathlon. Important thing to me has always been to keep pushing the limit and inspiring others.”

There was a Kenyan double in Berlin as Gladys Cherono won the women’s race in 2:18:11, a course record and the sixth-fastest time in history.

The Times


#854

The marathon runners are just unbelievable. A few years ago I did a half marathon as part of the Melbourne Marathon. At one point I was trotting south along St Kilda Road when I heard a wave of applause coming my way. It was the lead runners in the full marathon on the other side of the road running north. They passed close by me and I could not believe the speed at which they were running. I could not have run that fast even for 50 metres, even 40 years ago. (I’m Noonan vintage.) The sight of them did make me pick up my pace though. And those runners did about 2.11 from memory.


#855

Works out to a 70 second 400m (or thereabouts).
Only he ran 200+ of them lol.


#856

How far could you keep up with kip choge.
I could go between 400-800m


#857

I’ve had both…straight cut in the early 2000’s… keyhole about 2012. Took longer to recover from the keyhole.

That was symptomless…except that my innie turned to an outie.

It was so painful getting out of bed, rocking myself to sit up. First time I was back at work (sedentary) in a week, second time took a fortnight.


#858

Bullshit…you’re older than me. Maybe only a couple of years though.


#859

Also, Shelton made up the bit about dying when he got to Athens. Bit of a drama queen.


#860

Is that some dig about Greeks and queens?