Photos you‘ve taken

I took this today and looking at it tonight I wish I’d taken a moment to stop (I was hiking around some temples) and try to get that sunlight streaming through the trees better. Does anyone use a surefire camera setting to achieve those bursting rays?

Sunstars (if you’re referring to the tines around the sun in that pic) are a function of the aperture blade design, and generally smaller apertures (bigger F number) as it’s a product of diffraction . Your best chance is to stop any lens down to F/16 - F/22 (whatever the lens can go to) in daylight. At night , because street lights are much smaller points of light, you can sometimes see them appear at earlier f-stops.

A lot of modern lenses have less pleasing sunstars than older ones because the curved aperture blades that produce smooth bokeh work against the sunstar effect, as do better modern coatings on the glass.

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Thanks Sal, that’s interesting to know. Yeah, sunstars.

You can also cheat and get filters to do so.

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Mmm BBQ

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Jeremy I just point and shoot and hope for the best!! Hope all is good in Japan.

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Ohh, that’s a beaut!

Not bad for a phone shot!!

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Likely previously posted (phone, but basically a product of low sun and a hint of fog):

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Checking the info on my camera, the shot I posted was f/16 so right on the edge of working. I deliberately stopped it down for depth in the shot, but it couldn’t reduce the shutter speed anymore in that low light and keep a steady hand.
If I had my time again I would change the ISO setting from 200 to maybe 640 or 800 to hit a smaller aperture at that shutter speed. Wasn’t really thinking at the time, just quick snapping to keep up with my wife on the trail!

Assuming your wife is Japanese, Japanese women seem to walk really really fast.

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She is, but mainly she just wanted to see stuff rather than indulge me in stopping to frame shots all the time :joy:

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A kit zoom lens stopped down to F/22 purely for sunstar attempt.

The shots above by Dave, Bob are beautiful . The foliage / mist is doing the work and in some ways they aren’t diffraction induced “sunstars” , you’d probably have caught those rays fully open.

You can often provoke the tines by using leaves , even edges of buildings to split and diffract the light. I’ve got one somewhere that I used a small hole in a leaf to act as the tiny aperture rather than the lens.

Edit : found it.

Shot with a manual focus lens so I’m not sure what the aperture was, but the pinhole in the leaf split it for me anyway.

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Oh, and if you’re using a SLR /digital SLR / optical viewfinder, just be careful with the sun in the frame and focus points, lol.

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One other thing, if your lens needs f/16 and beyond to get the effect, you’re also trading off overall image sharpness across the frame. Generally, it won’t matter.

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Niiiiiiiiiiice.

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Just another spectacular pic Sal

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Ha, thanks mate but that was literally just a snap to see what a kit zoom would do stopped right down.

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