Political Correctness


#1348

I get that you think it’s ridiculous.
But one day off from school is not falling foul of compulsory schooling.
I’d let my kid off school for a day to watch Essendon train.
In fact I’m sure I’ve let her have days off school for worse reasons.

Again, especially on November 30, when they’re just marking time anyway.


#1349

You are being serious ???

Maybe the more young people protested about climate change, then us old people might get the farking message.


#1350

One persons ridiculous, is another’s Impactful statement.

I have no idea why you don’t get the meaning of a “Strike”, …

Are you just being deliberately contrarian here? I don’t know why you can’t get this.


#1351

not keeping track of current Australian politics?


#1352

Maybe it shows that they have been paying attention and have learnt something they feel is important enough to act on. I’d call that successful schooling myself.


#1353

Not at all.

Today was a school day.

Go to freakin school.

What’s wrong with protesting on a school holiday or weekend?

Striking over their own education?

I have no problem with kids or anyone protesting.


#1354

I think you missed my point. Would they all turn up on a weekend or school holiday?

Or just to get out of Math class?


#1355

I reckon on this issue they would.


#1356

Look at all these kids destined for the dole-queue.


#1357

Let’s say they did it to get out of math class.
What do you want to do about it?


#1358

I just had to do a massive Hr intervention this week because I said to someone they where “talking out their ■■■■” after being pointed at and told I was not doing my job properly ! ( In fact I was doing my job properly )
So now I am reporting every swear word of every little bit of manipulation and adhering to rules, I roster 64 people, this all used to be water under the bridge to me. People can really shoot them selves in the foot sometimes.


#1359

Told them to get out of my way when I’m trying to do business.

Fwiw, I am a bit of a fatalist on the issue. If their parents had of really cared about the issue, those kids wouldn’t exist.


#1360

Consider hunger strikes - which, given your argument - are far far more ‘ridiculous’.
Yet they have achieved results - by demonstrating how important the issue is to the protester.

There is also the ‘secondary’ or ‘indirect’ angle. Raising awareness to the subject, and making public how important it is to those protesting.

Does this make sense to you?


#1361

So nurses strike when people are healthy and wharfies when boats have left for sea.

Sort of defeats the point doesn’t it?

Or have I missed something?

Your not giving kids much credit or respect here.


#1362

It probably boils down to the old “i was trying to have a quiet walk down the otherwise deserted Swanston St and there was a bunch of people there! How dare they!?”


#1363

Peaceful protests are a sign of a vibrant democracy. When democracy is on the decline across the world, seeing kids peacefully protest gives me hope that the next generation will hold firm to democratic principles.


#1364

Bet you that Canavan and his ilk were wishing a tank would confront a lone protester yesterday.


#1365

l was there also that day, one of the most meaningful days of my entire education. l ended up meeting a grandmother who was there with a toddler in a big pram. We talked the entire way from parliament house to Swanston St. and l pushed the pram. At the time l was one of those who were meant to register for the draft and be sent to Vietnam. Result? l never registered for the draft and became a draft resistor. l have since been to Vietnam seven times, it is a wonderful country and l love going there, for a time l even considered moving and settling there. That day was the beginning of my own journey towards becoming a political animal.

Fast forward to the early 90’s when there was a protest in the city against tertiary education loans. The school l was teaching at during that time was very progressive and when students informed the school they wanted to attend the protest we supported them and l drove the school bus to take them. Result? Some protesters got in a scuffle with the police and got arrested. The protest quickly disintegrated, as some attacked the police vehicles and damaged them. The mood quickly turned ugly and we got our students out of the way, and then got them out of there. The protest as an issue died with the vandalism, as the media quickly turned it into a law and order issue, and portrayed the protest as a violent one.

People over the age of 18, have the right to vote and also the right to protest, many of them are students. People under that age although they can’t vote, also have the right to protest. Missed lessons can be made up, the chance to express your beliefs in an organized manner doesn’t come around often. People protest against things they believe strongly in, otherwise they stay at home.,


#1366

I walked down Bourke Street next to Jim Cairns listening to his words and the abuse he received from some onlookers.

I also refused to register for the draft lottery. Mine was the last draft and Gough got elected so it never happened, so I am not officially a draft resistor, but I would have gone to jail if it had, I guess.

Peaceful protests are always the most successful, and it makes me excited to see this current one and gives me greater hope.

Vietnam is an interesting place; the politics is something very foreign to me and equating socialism with the forced removal of people’s from there homes to build luxury holiday resorts at Da Nang is a mystery to me.


#1367

I would have been in the second last draft, but l also would have gone to gaol rather than to fight in Vietnam, as l was convinced that the Vietnamese people were never a threat to Australia. That was a cynical war, fought to preserve capitalism and nothing more.