Season 2019 - Gold Coast


#41

People tipped us to go 0-22 in 2016. To be honest this list is worse than when we had half a team suspended. It’s got to be the worst list seen in the AFL since Fitzroy in their final years. They have some decent kids but there’s a lot of junk from other clubs.


#42

Oh, has C*nton finally been wound up?

(Seriously: a 2 win side with 3x 30+ year olds in the top 5 of their B&F. Gold Coast will be bad - Carlton are an all time shitshow)


#43

They have one of the best, if not, the best academy zone. Better than Sydney.


#44

I agree but my point is that as a playing group how can you create an inviting environment when you have leaders leaving in droves. I mean Jarrod Harbrow is the elder statesman FFS


#45

They don’t, now.
They used to have the NSW Riverina, which - other than 4 Danihers, Carey, Crawford, Paul kelly, Longmire, Mooney, Brownless, Schneider, Hawkins, Breust, Isaac Smith etc etc etc - had never even heard of this “football”.


#46

I wouldn’t count on that. Sure the current admin haven’t been as eager to compromise the comp for their pet projects as they were in the 2000’s BUT when the reality that tens maybe hundreds of millions spent on GC could be a total waste I have little doubt that concessions will be on the table again.

The biggest indictment on the GC’s current list is the fact that in spite of their ladder positions they only have 4 players even nominated as rising stars from the last 5 drafts. The assumption is that 2018 was a great haul but you can’t even really say at this point they have young talent to build from.


#47

There’s a fair case there’s more compromise to the comp now than there was in the 2000s.

The 2000s had COLA, F/S and priority picks. Other than that it was a straight draft, the worst team got pick 1 and 17 and 43 etc. priority picks had a clear and transparent rule as to when they were applied.

Now we have priority picks, state league picks, academy fairy dust picks, future pick trading, free agency, free agency compo picks, plus they’re clearly happy to approve trades that don’t add up, as well as trades that don’t actually get lodged before deadlines. And the AFL makes almost all of these decisions using the sorting hat from Harry Potter.


#48

The potential is probably worse but so far the priority picks haven’t been wielded in a blatantly compromised way like the COLA was. I hate the Academy picks but future trading, free agency etc again don’t seem to be only utilised to promote the expansion clubs. The changes that have made changing clubs easier have been the biggest problems for GC & now GWS so again I don’t think they fit with an agenda to see the new clubs artificially prosper.


#49

There’s far, far, far more compo picks now. They’re just spread out.

I’m not arguing for the re-introduction of COLA, but it was at least transparent, and consistent.

And the COLA, and old-style priority picks, actually worked at evening up the comp. I think in the 10-12 years they were in play, every club (bar two) played in a GF.


#50

It was transparent & consistent in only benefiting the AFL’s chosen teams. Thats the big difference for mine. I agree there’s still too many variances & a lot of potential for compromising the comp - hence why i posted that future concessions for GC are likely. At least now the compo picks etc at least seem to be open for more than the expansion clubs to exploit. The Academy picks are the last remnants of blatant cheating.

The old style compo was really finished up by 2006 (just in time for us) replaced by the end of 1st round pick which you’d be hard pressed to argue had a significant impact on evening the comp. I believe the 2010’s have been more even than the 00’s. I’d suggest its been more the fact that drafting & trading have become far more professional across the board plus the cap working as intended.


#51

GC had 3 or 4 compo picks this year.
So whilst you’re right in theory, in reality the clubs who get players picked off the most (GC and Brisbane over the last few years) are getting the most compo picks. The AFL would make the argument that if COLA still existed, they’d be better at retaining talent. And they’d be right, although to what extent is anyone’s guess.

I guess I’d rather the draft be uncompromised than the salary cap.


#52

I’m the opposite - the draft is still a bit of a lottery & Carlton are proof that lots of early picks doesn’t equal success. The cap on the other hand is something I believe needs to be untainted. Again I think the cap more than any draft changes has been the driving force behind a more even comp. As you say GC & GWS are continually compensated for loss of players with early picks but the reality is they are less likely to break even let alone come out on top in most of those scenarios.


#53

It’s (EDIT: COLA) only been gone one year, how on earth can you judge??


#54

The cap is gone??? The COLA only ever directly benefited the expansion clubs so I believe having a standard salary cap for the other teams is far more responsible for evening up the comp than any draft concessions, priority picks or free agency. All those other factors still have to exist within the constraints of the cap. Its why I believe the COLA was a far more insidious bastardisation of the integrity of the comp than any other AFL intervention.


#55

Never underestimate just how crapola Carlton are, it is in their bones.


#56

They have brand new facilities up there and have for a couple of years now. Probably about the same as our level excluding the indoor field. Apparently this was promised to be ready 2 or so years into their introduction and only arrived year 6 or something.


#57

They do now, because their training facilities and ground were being re developed in the first half of 2018. Hence playing home games here, there and everywhere.


#58

Wrong as usual, they were already in the new facilities at the start of the 2017 season, they didn’t play the first half of the 2018 season on the gold coast due to the Commonwealth Games.


#59

Oh ok, probably old info then.


#60

Does he? The number of players who left (or wanted out) at the end of last year doesn’t really indicate there is a lot of faith in Dew and his plans.