What annoys you? Extra time

a customer is struggling to open the door. what should you do?
a- shoot them
b- call them a racist slur
c- open the door for them
d- arson

Why would anyone want to employ you if you can’t be ■■■■■■ spending a couple of minutes answering some questions?

Is this the induction for a normal workplace or a staffer at PHON?

My answer will change accordingly.

Why would I want to be asked questions, if the person who should be asking the questions can’t be farked to turn up to an interview to ask the questions?

You can tell a great deal from a company from their attitude to prospective employees…

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It’s like doing a cover letter.

Or the chip packet that you still munch through stale sadly

Yes I still sadly eat through both

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At my work, there are hundreds of applicants when a particular role gets advertised. Candidates do the automated recorded interview that’s assessed with AI to get to a manageable number of candidates. The hiring manager can then assess resumes and highlighted interviews before having live interviews.

Every job I’ve ever advertised has attracted north of a hundred applicants. With a cover letter and CV it’s really not that hard to get 200 applications down to 10. 40% of them (possibly more) are complete tyre-kickers, 25% can’t spell or write (that’s where the cover letter works beautifully), another 15% are overqualified, 15% underqualified. Getting the remainder down to 4-6 is the tricky bit, but that’s where your experience and gut feel comes in.

Most recruiters I’ve come across are little more than self-interested people-smugglers desperately seeking their commission who don’t know their arse from their elbow. I wouldn’t trust any of them to know specifically what I’m looking for, any more than I’d trust AI. As a hiring manager I owe it to myself and to short-listed prospective employees to give it my time and attention to end up with the best person. HR people are probably less interested - they’ve got their other two-fifths of fark-all to be occupying themselves with. Is it a time drain? Yep, sure, but I’m not that busy or self-important to think it’s beneath me.

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Store in the fridge. It’s dry in there…

I like job recruiters and always use them for work. also have trusted them to hire for me, but I know the good ones in Sydney who know their clientele.

Agree there’s rubbish ones, but I just deal with the good guys

Grrrrrr

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Yeah, yeah… I know… I’ve been on the receiving end too.

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I worked in employment services for 40+ years and one of the things that p*ssed me off the most was when an employer told me (or the applicant) that they were over qualified.

The applicant realises that but still applies…because they want a damn job!!!

If they have the skills required, it’s then on the employer to ensure that the person wants to stay (because the employer’s excuse is always that the person will only stay until something better comes up :face_with_symbols_over_mouth:)

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It’s clearly so they can stop the interview after hearing the first answer without being impolite. Some probably also screen for accents, sadly.

Need to set up an AI to do your interviews for you.

i’m probably missing something but this just sounds like reading cvs but with extra steps

We have some roles across our facilities that are absolutely mind numbing and robotic and that’s the exact kind of people needed for the job so we get applicants that are way too highly qualified for the job and as a rule we bin their applications as they can often be more trouble than they are worth

blueberry / strawberry containers . they fall out the fridge and they imediatley spread to all corners of the kitchen

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I have always wondered if the urban legend of an IQ test at the police will fail your application if you test too high is true or just a joke

I have a mate who worked in one of those mind numbing jobs in his early 20s.

He is now a partner at PwC.