Cooking


#181
Okra is pretty boring.

To me it’s more of a texture thing, a bit mushy like a cooked zucchini. I’m pretty sure they’re just a cheap vegetable that would’ve been used to throw into the pot to fill out the dish.

Yeah…it has a slimy texture and probably can be dispensed with, but it’s a traditional ingredient…I’ve heard it’s where the word gumbo comes from.

Just be careful not to overdo the sausage. It can overpower the taste, while chicken is pretty bland.


#182
Anyone got any experience with Gumbo?

Yeah ,the ■■■■■■ injury prone.


#183
Anyone got any experience with Gumbo?

I’ve done a few…but years back.

It takes hours. You’ve got to get the roux right first…takes about 45 minutes.

There are short cuts but it’s not the same thing.

The first essential is the roux.
The second essential is the Cajun trinity of equal amounts of onion, celery and capsicum.

Then stock.
Then okra
Then you can throw in almost anything you want, eg. Chicken, seafood, chorizo (does take over so careful)

Yeah the goal is to get that roux super dark and that takes a lot of time and stirring.


#184
Anyone got any experience with Gumbo?

I’ve done a few…but years back.

It takes hours. You’ve got to get the roux right first…takes about 45 minutes.

There are short cuts but it’s not the same thing.

The first essential is the roux.
The second essential is the Cajun trinity of equal amounts of onion, celery and capsicum.

Then stock.
Then okra
Then you can throw in almost anything you want, eg. Chicken, seafood, chorizo (does take over so careful)

Yeah the goal is to get that roux super dark and that takes a lot of time and stirring.

http://jesspryles.com/how-to-make-a-roux/

And FFS don’t let the roux burn or you’ve got to throw it out.


#185

Probably been done before but I made a lighter crumbed chicken breast. But the breast was chopped into tiny bits (not minced) then marinated in light soy, mirin, black pepper and sake. One egg to hold it all together and mix well.

Lightly oiled fry pan. Then add panko crumb to cover pan. Add breast. Add panko on top to cover. Press down with spatula but not to heavily.

Turn on low heat. Turn once every 5 minutes. Finishes in 20 minutes.

The result was so light, fluffy and toasty. Went well with spinach leaves, ciabatta bread and japanese mayonnaise (jap mayo has a bit of mustard in it).


#186
Probably been done before but I made a lighter crumbed chicken breast. But the breast was chopped into tiny bits (not minced) then marinated in light soy, mirin, black pepper and sake. One egg to hold it all together and mix well.

Lightly oiled fry pan. Then add panko crumb to cover pan. Add breast. Add panko on top to cover. Press down with spatula but not to heavily.

Turn on low heat. Turn once every 5 minutes. Finishes in 20 minutes.

The result was so light, fluffy and toasty. Went well with spinach leaves, ciabatta bread and japanese mayonnaise (jap mayo has a bit of mustard in it).

Sounds really interesting. Never heard anything like it tbh.

So it’s kinda like a giant chicken schnitzel?


#187
Probably been done before but I made a lighter crumbed chicken breast. But the breast was chopped into tiny bits (not minced) then marinated in light soy, mirin, black pepper and sake. One egg to hold it all together and mix well.

Lightly oiled fry pan. Then add panko crumb to cover pan. Add breast. Add panko on top to cover. Press down with spatula but not to heavily.

Turn on low heat. Turn once every 5 minutes. Finishes in 20 minutes.

The result was so light, fluffy and toasty. Went well with spinach leaves, ciabatta bread and japanese mayonnaise (jap mayo has a bit of mustard in it).

Sounds really interesting. Never heard anything like it tbh.

So it’s kinda like a giant chicken schnitzel?

Well yeah, I suppose it is. The secret to me was the breast that was chopped up. It allowed the juices to flow inbetween everything.


#188

My partner actually described is as somewhere between a schnitzel and a burger pattie.


#189

GF day I over cooked my ribs and they dried out, this time I under smoked them.

These ones turned out Very good, aside from not enoug bark (kids gonna kid), and the pic probably doesn’t do it justice cause it’s the end cut.


#190
Anyone know a simple recipe for chicken risotto?

Equal parts leek and chicken thigh. The leek helps to compliment the creaminess of the risotto. I sweat the leek with some butter and garlic first. Then do the typical risotto cooking process adding some grated pumpkin early on. Season with salt and pepper at the end.


#191

This works fantastic. So simple. Im using beer gas to instantly carbonate it, but Im sure the yeast will work just as well


#192

Very simple and nice pizza dough, takes literally minutes to make


#193

Lighting up the pizza oven in the backyard tonight. We’ve only perfected it once where it was hotter than the thermometer could mention (400°C).


#194
This works fantastic. So simple. Im using beer gas to instantly carbonate it, but Im sure the yeast will work just as well

http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2013/09/the-old-fashioned-way-homemade-ginger-beer/

More than two ingredients but this works very well.

taste.com.au/recipes/14433/pizza+dough


#195
This works fantastic. So simple. Im using beer gas to instantly carbonate it, but Im sure the yeast will work just as well

http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2013/09/the-old-fashioned-way-homemade-ginger-beer/

More than two ingredients but this works very well.

taste.com.au/recipes/14433/pizza+dough

Oops! Quoted the wrong one.


#196
Anyone know a simple recipe for chicken risotto?

Equal parts leek and chicken thigh. The leek helps to compliment the creaminess of the risotto. I sweat the leek with some butter and garlic first. Then do the typical risotto cooking process adding some grated pumpkin early on. Season with salt and pepper at the end.


Add a glass of white wine in there too, and one for the chef

#197

The perfect bolognese sauce.

First of all, everyone’s idea of perfect is going to be different. I’ve been making this since I was in my teens. Back then it was what I would describe now as an abomination. Capsicum, black olives, mushrooms… Over the years I’ve gotten the ingredients a lot closer to what could be described as more “traditional”. At different times I’ve had access to home made tomato sauces, fresh pork mince. Not these days. I just try to track down the best I can find locally in shops and markets. The only thing that has come from someone’s home is the herbs which are out of my garden.

200g of streaky bacon
500g of beef mince (lean as possible)
300g of pork mince
2 medium carrots, diced
2 stalks of celery, diced
1 large brown onion, diced
4 cloves or garlic, minced (yes, I’m a garlic freak)
chopped fresh herbs (sage, thyme, rosemary, oregano)
ground salt and pepper (good quality)
decent quality liquid beef stock
cup of decent quality red wine (or cup and a half). Don’t go putting Grange in it but don’t put the crap that you can’t bring yourself to drink in it either. It does effect the flavor.
best quality pasata sauce you can get your hands on. Rich, thick. You shouldn’t need to add sugar if you’ve got a good tomato sauce.
high quality olive oil. Lots. About a quarter cup or slightly more. This is an indulgence. We’re not ■■■■■■■ around here.
small dob of lard or butter (lard makes a difference)
pinch of nutmeg
Chili flakes (optional as is the amount)
decent dash of milk at the end of cooking. Enough to get a rich orange colour. Buttermilk is good but not essential.
Fresh basil on top at serving time regardless of what you’re doing with it.

Use a heavy pot. It’s gotta cook for a long time. I use my trusty old ancient Staub.

Get everything chopped and ready before you start. You don’t want to be distracted doing things at crucial stages.

Start out getting the oil and lard up to hot enough that when you throw in the onion it’s going to sizzle. Test with a bit of onion and then start with the bacon, whole. Get it nice and brown. Doesn’t need to be crispy yet though. Take it out and dice it. Onions go in and cook till just going brown. Turn down the heat and let it slowly transform. Onion is a really important flavor in cooking whether it’s curries or this. It needs to really brown up slowly. At this stage a lot of stirring. Put the bacon back in and get it gently sizzling again. Slowly, slowly is the key at this point. Some people like to ditch the oil and start again at this point. I say that’s freaking crazy. Keep all the bacony, lardy goodness.

Turn up the heat again. Now the carrot and celery until just getting soft. Again, lots of stirring. Once that happens the crucial thing is getting the garlic in at the right time. Depending on how finely it’s chopped. I have a chopper that makes roughly 1 cubic millimeter cuts. I’m not into crushers because it squeezes out the juice and then burns away in the pot. Chop it finely with a knife but don’t crush it. Garlic is just as important as getting the onion right. It has to go fully translucent and let out it’s oils without it or anything else going too dark. I don’t put the garlic in early with the onion. It overcooks, I find. As soon as it has started to go nice and soft start adding the beef and pork mince in clumps at a time. I have no idea of this makes a difference, it’s just what I do. Seems easier and you can keep an eye on how everything is looking. The oils getting released from the onion and garlic will absorb into the meat. Brown it all. It doesn’t have to be 100% cooked, just enough so that the liquids can absorb easily. Herbs go in now. I use more than most recipes do. Probably a few tablespoons all up. The cooking time will tame it down a lot and mix it through nicely. Stir it through until you can smell it all releasing oils for a while. Maybe a minute or even two. Crack a whole bunch of good salt and pepper in there. add the nutmeg and chili flakes. Don’t add too much nutmeg. Measure it if you don’t have a steady hand. 1 teaspoon tops.

Now it’s time for liquids. While the pot is still hot, add the red wine, leave it for a sec while it reduces and is combining with everything. Don’t let it burn! Then add the beef stock. Get it bubbling and reduce it back to a wettish, crumbly texture before you add the pasata. If it isn’t covering everything evenly have a back up good quality can of diced tomatoes. It should be swimming in bright red tomato at this stage. I use Mutti brand for pasata and tins. Nice and rich but it’s not really as good as some home made sauces I’ve had the luxury to get hold of in the past. I tend to use a jar and a can most times. Get this bubbling away for a while on medium heat and stir every few minutes to make sure it’s not sticking to the bottom. Once it’s simmering evenly for a while turn it down and walk away for 10, 15 minutes. Keep checking on it until it reduces to a nice thick consistency but not going dry. Almost the thickness you’d want it to be on the plate.

Now you turn the heat down as much as possible. Taste it. It should be starting to taste like it will when you eat it but a bit “immature” if you take my meaning. All the basic flavors should be there though. If it’s bland you’ve forgotten something. It won’t be. Put it on the smallest burner. Put the lid on. If you’re concerned about it being too dry add a little bit of water but not too much. Get that sucker warm and cosy because it needs to slowly bubble for at least 3 hours. Preferably 4. Maybe get away with 2 if you’re storing it in the fridge overnight and using it tomorrow but the longer the better. Check on it every 15 minutes or so and make sure it’s not sticking to the bottom. It does need to be stirred occasionally but not too often. Right at the end you stir the milk in and get it all rich and orange coloured.

And there it is. You’ll have a rich, tasty sauce that does everything it’s supposed to do. That’s what I reckon the best way to do this is. You can serve it up with pasta, make it into lasagne. Hell, have it with some crusty bread. Always add a good Parmesan.

Would love to hear some tips from others. I’ve had compliments from Italian mates and seem to get asked to make it by family and friends a fair bit. I can’t say it absolutely compares to some sauces I’ve tried at mate’s places but it’s not too far off in my own humble opinion (and I’ll never know their secrets).


#198
Anyone know a simple recipe for chicken risotto?

Equal parts leek and chicken thigh. The leek helps to compliment the creaminess of the risotto. I sweat the leek with some butter and garlic first. Then do the typical risotto cooking process adding some grated pumpkin early on. Season with salt and pepper at the end.


Add a glass of white wine in there too, and one for the chef

I always cook with wine, sometimes I even add it to the food.


#199

Decided to make a tortilla last night and was using a mandolin to slice potatoes.

Well…they say you should put a little bit of yourself into your cooking.

Ouch…nice little ellipse about 2cm x 1cm out of my left thumb, and it still hurts.

Might continue on tonight…I’ve done all the slicing I need. Just chopping capsicums and onions to go.

Have the hospital on speed dial.


#200

If it hurts it means you’ve not cut through the nerves.

Slicing prociutto i went through the nerves from the middle finger fingernail half way to the next knuckle below. needed a bit of corrective surgery.