Richie Benaud had skin cancer, and you might too


#1

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/cricket/richie-benaud-reveals-he-is-having-treatment-for-skin-cancer-could-call-test-from-his-loungeroom/story-fni2usfi-1227118730900

 

Should we allow/insist that the great man retires with the dignity he deserves.


#2

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/cricket/richie-benaud-reveals-he-is-having-treatment-for-skin-cancer-could-call-test-from-his-loungeroom/story-fni2usfi-1227118730900

 

Should we allow/insist that the great man retires with the dignity he deserves.

His choice not ours, we should have no say in it whatsoever.


#3

strange op.  richie will be dignified no matter what he chooses to do.  its in the man, not an illusory matter.


#4

I couldn't help wondering why the damage done to his skin as a young man (during his playing days) took so long to surface in this way. Does it lay dormant or does old age interact with previous damage and become cancerous? 

All the best Richie.


#6

I couldn't help wondering why the damage done to his skin as a young man (during his playing days) took so long to surface in this way. Does it lay dormant or does old age interact with previous damage and become cancerous? 

All the best Richie.

Many cancers take a long time to manifest. Even warning signs can come decades after the initial damage has been done.  


#7

With the Cricket season here, and Ritchie long ago succumbed to this bastardd of a disease, it’s timely to get a reminder to look after your skin in the Sun, … many Cricketers well known, and only known to their freinds, have left this World because of it, … far TOO many.

Skin cancer, the cricketer’s curse

Former Australian Test cricketer and commentator Max Walker, who has died aged 68, is among a list of famous cricketers who battled skin cancer.

Updated Updated 28 September 2016

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  • Former Australian cricketer and commentator Max Walker, 68, died in September 2016 after a two-year battle with melanoma

  • Fellow Aussie cricketing legend Richie Benaud, 84, died in April 2015 after revealing five months earlier he was battling skin cancer

  • Former English spinner John Emburey, 64, had a basal cell carcinoma removed from his forehead in May 2014

  • Former England coach Andy Flower, 48, had a melanoma cut out of his cheek during the first Ashes Test in Brisbane in November 2010

  • Former Australian captain Michael Clarke, 35, had three non-melanoma skin cancers removed from his face and has been a Cancer Council ambassador since 2010.


The Cancer Council has given new advice on the use of Sunscreen, and all Blitzers and everyone they care for should heed it.

Knew I should have invested in Sunscreen shares.

Slip Slop Slap people,. . pls.

(Now this is a thread Bump… :no_mouth:)

thenewdaily.com.au

New guidelines urge us to make sunscreen ‘part of morning routine’ like brushing teeth | The New Daily

The New Daily @TheNewDailyAU

3-4 minutes

Australians have been urged to take a more aggressive sun safety approach, with new scientific guidelines now advising people apply sunscreen every single day as part of their routine.

The new advice, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health on Friday, says applying sunscreen should become part of the morning routine, like brushing teeth.

The report advises that merely slapping on sunscreen when planning to spend time outside has become insufficient to guard against UV rays.

Repeated, small doses of sunlight received through activities like hanging out the washing is enough to damage skin cells and cause skin cancer.

The report says we should use sunscreen every day when the maximum UV level is forecast to be three or higher.

For much of Australia, that means people should apply sunscreen all year round, with the exception of Tasmania and Victoria where there are a few months over winter when sunscreen is not required.

Associate Professor Rachel Neale, one of the study’s lead authors, said Australians “get a lot of incidental sun exposure from everyday activities, such as walking to the bus stop or train station”.

She said it was essential people take heed of the new recommendations, which are a step beyond what most public health organisations have previously recommended.

Cancer Council prevention advisor Craig Sinclair says fewer Australians should develop skin cancer if they follow the new advice.

“Australia has one of the highest skin cancer rates in the world and research shows that sunscreen helps prevent skin cancer, including the deadliest form, melanoma,” he said.

The advice is especially relevant in light of the heatwave conditions affecting many parts of the country.

“In relation to UV levels above three over the course of the day, for this time of year that’s anywhere in Australia,” Mr Sinclair said.

And he added that Australians must get over some myths about sunscreen.

“Worryingly, research from Cancer Council’s National Sun Protection Survey showed that nearly one in two Australians mistakenly believe that sunscreen can’t be used safely on a daily basis,” Mr Sinclair said.

“The advice is now simple: make sunscreen part of your morning routine, just like brushing your teeth.”

Anyone who spends extended periods of time outside must apply extra sources of protection, Dr Stephen Schumack from the Australasian College of Dermatologists told the ABC.

“People need to remember that sunscreen isn’t a suit of armour,” Dr Schumack said.

“If you’re planning outdoors activities, like playing or watching sport, going fishing, or working outdoors, you should also seek shade, wear a hat, protective clothing and sunglasses, and reapply your sunscreen every two hours.”

The latest advice on sunscreen, based on where you live:

  • All year round: Brisbane, Perth and Darwin
  • Every month except June: Sydney
  • Every month except June and July: Canberra and Adelaide
  • Every month except between May and July: Melbourne
  • Every month except between May and August: Hobart

-with AAP


#8

Apparently sunscreen prevents wrinkles.


#9

It certainly aids in the prevention of Death by mole.


#10

Basically saying “people are morons, this is the only chance we have of training them”.


#11

With Richie passing away nearly 4 years ago, the thread title isn’t up to date and the whole thread skipped the dying bit.

Seems a little odd, maybe just a skin cancer thread should be split off instead of the 4 year bump maybe @DJR???

RIP Richie


#12

I wouldn’t know anything about skin cancer, @SCarey


#13

I’m confused …

I’m tired …

I’ll get my coat.


#14

The cream, the bone, the white, the off-white, the ivory or the beige?


#15

The light coloured one.


#16

I get where you’r coming from SC.

Might have fixed it with an edit to my Bump post …

Dave might just change the title to Skin Canc claims the great RB or the like??


#17

Thanks BSD, I think DJR was just being obscure, as he can be, but I wasn’t quite up to it.


#18

Dave is just not completely himself anymore you might say, … :no_mouth:

(He lost a fair swag of Ear to this barstard thing.)


#19

Two years clear.

Boring.


#20

Oh, sorry to hear @DJR, I’ve only had a tame but persistent one removed from my face 3 times. Not much in the scheme of things.

Hoping yours will continue to behave.

Oh, and you’ve changed the thread title, that works.


#21

Title change did crack me up.:smile: