Space

A bit mathematically challenged in Toowoomba…?

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also clocking up marriage #4. (The bride looks good for 63)

Was going to say she does for 63

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Venus and moon just appearing out of the Sunset now. Look due West, fairly low in the sky. Moon is just a sliver. Saturn will appear nearby as the light fades.

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It’s a beautiful sight tonight.

Just came out to get a photo annnndddd goneski

There will be some spectacular photos from tonight. Anyone with sight of the city would have copped a beautiful view tonight.

I managed a few shots but most will need some work on the computer as the iso’s were climbing rapidly. Might have a decent one, might not.

This one manages to faintly show Saturn (below Venus) as well.

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And NZ continues their rocket launch success.

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This is getting more promising. Hundreds of years or longer are extremely problematic for detecting signals even if there is life, but at 31 years it becomes a little less unrealistic. Conceivably, you could achieve two way communication in less than a lifetime. -

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I like the idea that we still can’t 100% know if the speed of light is constant. We can still only record the speed when reflecting off a surface (ie a to b to a). We could one day still find that a to b is instantaneous and b to a is half what we think the speed is.

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But I think the overall observation wouldn’t change for us, would it? As observers with a varying relationship to the speed of light, time dilation would produce identical absolute speeds? Maybe? My brain hurts, lol.

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Mind bending stuff, lol, and that makes it great.

Ok, it’s the height of absurdity for someone like me to posit something that far far smarter would have undoubtedly considered and answered. But can we not verify the value of “C” via the E=mc2 equation? There’s no directionality inherent to lights vacuum speed within the energy released by a given mass, (as far as I know, lol). If we can measure the energy released by a known isotope mass does that not confirm the C standard constant?

The other thing that I love about light is that the photon exists in a timeless state. It arrives instantly , anywhere, based on its own reference clock. We see it arrive from, say, 300 million light years away, but if that photon was sentient it would not have experienced any time at all. I’ve no idea how or what, but I suspect the answer to understanding everything is tied up in that conundrum. The faster you can travel through the space part of spacetime, the less you’re impacted by the time section of spacetime. It seems you can trade one for the other. Just another reason to get out and exercise, hey? Actually, maybe it’s not just “fitness” that allows you to live longer than someone else. Maybe you gain a nano second or two just by constantly moving, lol.

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