The continuing death of journalism


#481

FWIW I’d be all for raising the pension age. Given the health system, life expectancy etc - it’s the easiest way to make a big dint in welfare spend. Re-jig the system to make it far more attractive for people to step down to part time, basically semi-retire.

It’s easy sport for conservatives in particular to drop the unemployment benefit by a few dollars, or make it harder to sign up - but it’s such a tiny fraction of the total welfare spend it’s really never going to make any difference to the budget.

This of course is never going to happen, would be hugely unpopular amongst the baby boomers.


#482

They can’t even get the terminology right; it’s called “Age Pension”.
“Aged” is for cheese, beef, wine etc.


#483

I don’t think it would be that simple unfortunately and don’t forget they have already raised the pension age to 67 for some of us. The problem is that if older people have to work longer, young people won’t get the jobs that are vacated by older people retiring.


#484

Here is another thought, only pay the pension when you have 50 years of employment and paying taxes behind you, like those lucky war babies and baby boomers.


#485

Who is going to do the analysis of what corporate welfare is costing “working Australians”?

Much easier to pit people against on another than address the massive elephant in the room. Media outlets are corporations, with power and influence. What power does a pensioner have?


#486

How would you factor women taking time out of payed employment to look after kids?


#487

Thread has lost the plot.


#488

The continuing death of thread posting.


#489

Would it work if you gave their hard-working men a pay raise?

ducks


#490

OOOh boy.


#491

I regard a mother raising her children as probably the most important job she will have. Despite the financial difficulties we went through, my wife remained at home until the youngest child was at school. She obtained part time work until the children were old enough and then went back to work full-time as a purchasing officer at the DoD for the next 34 years.
Of course, she started work at 15 and we were not cosseted like the 25yo children of today.


#492

I agree it is the most important job. Would she qualify for the pension under your 50 years work criteria?


#493

My mother and mother in law wouldn’t qualify.
Makes you wonder why you’d need a pension if you’d been working for fifty years, though.

Oh…got it.
It’s not about need at all.


#494

Need and a misplaced sense of entitlement are rarely seen in the same room.


#495

Add the disabled, sick and carers to the exempted list.


#496

Lot of battlers out there earning minimum wage which makes it very difficult to put much away for retirement.
If they’re lucky they’ve had compulsory super for the 2nd half of their working life, but that started as just 3%. Even now, 9.5% of min wage is not much.
Plenty of people have been getting Age Pension & other welfare payments undeservedly, but there are also many retirees, or approaching retirement, who do need it.


#497

Completely agree.


#498

Every single benefit should be means tested and applied pro rata.


#499

Yes.
By giving a proper grounding to the childs early life and providing a stable family environment there is less chance of the children developing into selfish little brats who think the world owes them a living.


#500

Didn’t have a cent in the bank until my sons moved out and 3 months later I wondered where all the money had come from.
Your comments are a bit rich considering the millennials save nothing, run up credit card debt and sponge off their parents until their late twenties.
By the way as an apprentice in the 1st of my 50 years of work I was on $10.50 week, less 75c tax and paid $3.00 in board, provided my own clothes, tools and fares, the rest I got to splurge on myself.