Appliance Buying Guide: What's good and stuff

Pretty sure they went out long ago .. the point is Sal's clock didn't (until it didn't fit with the new scatter cushions.. )

National are Panasonic.

I’ve got a fair bit of Samsung stuff, somehow. Not by any grand design.
TV (was the cheap cheap cheaaaaapest in either 40" or 50" when we bought about 5 years back) still plugging along, hasn’t had a fault.
Fridge I think is Samsung, 3 years old. Washing machine about the same, also Samsung.

Although, in general with large appliances, they either stuff up first year (manufacturing defect or knocked around in shipping) or after 6+ years. Not much in between.

Built in obsolescence* almost means that the older an appliance is, the more likely it is to last these days. As a for instance, I got a washing machine that had broken down through poor use for nix about 15 years ago, diagnosed the fault, & replaced a 20 dollar part. Still going like a train.

Particularly with sound equipment, I really like older stuff, but top end. You can pick it up at a good price, and know through reviews after years in the market place, if it’s good, or garbage.

Rotel CD player /pre & pow/amp system I picked up 2 years ago needed a tray wheel that had disintegrated via sitting on top of the Power amp, … it was $1.50 from China thru ebay … postage INCLUDED! Lol.

Gotta love the Interweb.

*http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/g202/planned-obsolescence-460210/

I dunno if it’s planned so much as they don’t care if it will last. It’s not like everything dies at 2 years or 5 years or whatever. Some does, some doesn’t - and it doesn’t seem particularly constrained by whether it was cheap or expensive to start with.

The reality is, long life doesn’t make them more money, whereas having a new feature or building it for $2 cheaper does.

Planned obs has been a strategy for decades HAP. I first heard about it in Form 1, when my science teacher told the class that light bulbs need never, that’s NEVER burn out, if they added just a poofteenth of Nitrogen to the gas mix inside the bulb, which they did originally, but quickly stopped, because they would then only sell one for each socket once, & breakage replacements.

Omitting the N gas, gave them a product to manufacture in perpetuity, well up 'til recently anyway.

Do a Google on it. Mobile phones are the new light bulbs, & crApple, the biggest offender.

I dunno if it's planned so much as they don't care if it will last. It's not like everything dies at 2 years or 5 years or whatever. Some does, some doesn't - and it doesn't seem particularly constrained by whether it was cheap or expensive to start with.

The reality is, long life doesn’t make them more money, whereas having a new feature or building it for $2 cheaper does.

Of course it’s planned. This is a great documentary which explains how it all started.

Jet fuel can’t etc.

Jet fuel can't etc.
Correct.

As I say, there’s a legit argument the “can we make this last X number of years” part of the design parameters is such a low priority it’s nearly non existent.
But that’s not the same as designing it to fail at X years.
The latter takes work. The former involves not doing work. And hence saving dollars.
Nobody is sitting in an office being paid to make the products worse. A lot of these design houses pump out so many designs on such a short development timeline they’ve barely got time to make them work in the first place.

And I daresay Apple are a lot better for product longevity than almost everyone in that market…

Facts is facts though, so …

Edit: And isn’t it Apple that makes phones that it’s almost impossible to even just replace the battery on??

I pretty much buy whatever they recommend.
I pretty much buy whatever they recommend.

http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-shovel/

Bought.

Facts is facts though, so ...

Edit: And isn’t it Apple that makes phones that it’s almost impossible to even just replace the battery on??


No. Takes 3? screwdrivers and about 45 minutes. Or you can pay them to do it.
And you’d be better off finding a part for a device that sells in tens of millions over a 2 year life span as a current model, than a model that’s there for 5 minutes.

I don’t particularly like Apple, but a big part of why they are/were the leader is they don’t (or at least didn’t - I see they now have 3 different sized iPads to go along with 3 different sized phones… ) have a zillion different models out there, and you get software support for at least 3 years. Not necessarily the case with HTC or Samsung anyone else.

BBQ isn’t really a small applicance but we have the kettle weber and the weber q. Mum and dad bought generic no name brands and have gone through about 10 bbqs in the same time. Finally went and bought a weber themselves.

I pretty much buy whatever they recommend.

http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-shovel/

What’s happened to the Spear and Jackson Noomber 3…with brass reinforced 'andle.

Facts is facts though, so ...

Edit: And isn’t it Apple that makes phones that it’s almost impossible to even just replace the battery on??

IIRC almost all the major brands have non-user replaceable batteries in their flagship models now.

LG the only exception.

Got a Bosch washing machine after discussing it with a repairman. He reckons in 20 years he only ever had to fix one that wasn’t the result of corrosion from people putting too much detergent it.

I’ve got a 42" Toshiba LCD that’s the better part of 12-13 years old. Heavier than most planets. I’ve been waiting for an excuse to get a new one (so I can discontinue use of the set-top box and WDTV box) but it still looks as good as it did on day one (that I owned it anyway).

BBQ isn't really a small applicance but we have the kettle weber and the weber q. Mum and dad bought generic no name brands and have gone through about 10 bbqs in the same time. Finally went and bought a weber themselves.

We’ve got my in-laws’ hand-me-down BBQ. They bought it soon after they got here in 1983 or so, and replaced it in about 1990 and chucked it in a corner of the garden and didn’t touch it after that. We got it about 2010? and gave it a bit of a clean and it’s all good. Checked all the gas fittings, all fine. No moving parts at all, don’t really see how they can stuff up?

I have a 68cm Sony Trinitron that was given to me when l was a teenager in 93. Young fella now uses it to watch cartoons out the back and to play wii on as he has a tendency to bang the screen and its so thick he just bounces off. Other tv’s have come and gone but that thing just keeps on going. I can’t get rid of it as its earned my respect.

For electronic stuff i have always had very good luck with National / Panasonic. I will pay extra to get the Pana version of two similar products.

Me too! I have a 42" Viera, which has been trouble free, but I’m considering upgrading to something newer and at least 55".

Looking for suggestions and recent experience. I don’t buy LG, ever.

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