Blitz Birders

Blame it on the Lockdown but my Better Half is now a fully fledged birdwatcher with a serious obsession to match. She’s a member of a website of birders and her aim is to view 100 separate species of bird within Victoria in the calendar year. BH’s reached 74 but a serious number on her site have already hit the ton and many more. When I asked her how many had reached that number in February without visiting the Werribee Sewerage Plant, she said through gritted teeth, “Probably none.” FYI Werribee Sewerage plant is allegedly the second best Birding site in Oz, with only Kakadu in front. One of my BH’s fellow birders photographed 63 separate species in a one day visit recently, but you need to obtain a key and pay a fee, and frankly, BH wouldn’t say this but I would, it seems like cheating.
74 in Feb seems like a lot but believe me it gets harder and harder and the last 10, if she gets there, are going to be hell. So having exhausted the local species we’re starting to travel, and just quietly it’s fun.

Went to Sherbrooke Forest today with one aim, the Lyrebird. Walked along a gorgeous track called the Lyrebird Track, no less, but counted more joggers than birds and finally met a local who told us the Lyrebirds don’t bother with eponymous tracks. So we were trudging back glumly to Grant’s picnic ground carpark when No 74 walked across the path, paused and basically said “The pic’s on me.”


26 to go.

PS. It’s not all rare birds, she still hasn’t got the common pigeon, which the birders call the Rock Dove, which you’ll see in the City Square. Might be heading there New Year’s Eve if she’s stuck on 99.

PPS Please feel free to post any pics of birds you have taken and tips about good birding sites are especially welcome.

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Post the list!

Seriously, though, post it. Depending on where you live (the peninsula, right?) and what’s common in your area, there’s a few I might be able to help you out with…

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Can highly recommend the book the “the big twitch”

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If you need an Ibis there’s one at Optus HQ

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So can you tell me why Pied Currawongs, never a bird that we saw in the city, are now taking over? 5 years ago I realised they were everywhere in the inner east, and this week I’ve heard them in the inner north for pretty much the first time.

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But yes, I’m with @Humble_Minion , post the list. Keen to ride the rollercoaster!

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Saladins list

Spotted Turtle Dove
Australian Magpie
Kookaburra

97 to go

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We saw 2 new birds today, the Lyrebird and the Pied Currawong. We get the Grey Currawong in Balnarring but not often, but never the Pied. My BH said the Currawong was a target today because she heard there were plenty in Sherbrooke.

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so that’s what a turtle dove looks like.

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List is coming, typing it out as I speak.

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The currawong is my favourite birdcall.
You can stick Kookaburras up your ■■■■ (although, yeah…it’s pretty cool when they land on your deck and take food).
The currawong is the sound of Australia, and most people don’t even know what they are.

Anyway…

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Can’t be. They come in pairs.

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Sorry Frosty I posted the reply on Saladin’s response by mistake.

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image

Them’s fightin’ words .

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The interesting thing about the currawong is that their call changes around the country: they have different “dialects”!

The classic one in central Victoria sounds like they are saying “you can’t trust the weather”; in the Gippsland hills it’s more like “can’t trust the wet weather”; in the ACT, it’s different again.

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The list which requires a pic for each species on the site, no honour system.
Bird List 2022

  1. Spotted dove
  2. Australian (White) Ibis
  3. Black shouldered kite
  4. Rainbow lorikeet
  5. Magpie
  6. Little wattlebird
  7. Grey fantail
  8. Willie wagtail
  9. Superb fairy wren
  10. Tree martin
  11. Noisy miner
  12. Tawny frogmouth
  13. Masked lapwing
  14. Pink eared duck
  15. Hoary headed grebe
  16. Pacific black duck
  17. Black swan
  18. Dusky moorhen
  19. Great cormorant
  20. Grey teal
  21. Australasian shoveler
  22. Australian swamphen
  23. Eurasian coot
  24. Sulphur-crested cockatoo
  25. Crested pigeon
  26. Chestnut teal
  27. King parrot
  28. Yellow-faced honeyeater
  29. Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo
  30. Laughing Kookaburra
  31. Golden Whistler
  32. Silvereye
  33. Eastern Yellow Robin
  34. Common Bronzewing
  35. New Holland Honeyeater
  36. Wood Duck
  37. Cape Barren Goose
  38. White-Faced Heron
  39. Grey Butcherbird
  40. Pacific Gull
  41. Silver Gull
  42. Pelican
  43. Blackbird
  44. Australian Raven
  45. Welcome Swallow
  46. Musk Duck
  47. Grey Shrike-Thrush
  48. Indian myna
  49. Little Corella
  50. Mistletoe bird
  51. Spotted pardalote
  52. Eastern rosella
  53. Brown Thornbill
  54. Galah
  55. Red Capped Plover
  56. White-browed scrubwren
  57. Eastern Spinebill
  58. Mudlark
  59. Straw Necked Ibis
  60. Swamp Harrier
  61. Little Penguin
  62. Musk Lorikeet
  63. Great Egret
  64. Little Pied Cormorant
  65. Royal Spoonbill
  66. Red Wattlebird
  67. Starling
  68. Crimson Rosella
  69. Red Rumped Parrot
  70. Kelp Gull
  71. Shining Bronze Cuckoo
  72. White Throated Treecreeper
  73. Pied Currawong
  74. Superb Lyrebird

Also seen:
Rufous Fantail
White eared honeyeater
Red browed finch
Yellow Billed Spoonbill

PS “Also Seen” means she’s not happy with the pic but it will count. BH is a perfectionist.

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