Diets


#1

Has anyone tried the paleo diet?

Is there any benefits to it?

I heard Garry ablett Jnr did it.


I don’t really need lose weight but might be a good idea to eat less processed foods.


#2

A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink

A reply to: @Shelton 10 regarding QuoteLink
A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink
A reply to: @Shelton 10 regarding QuoteLink
A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink
I had a look at myfitnesspal and used it to count kilojoules for a couple of days. It was a good experience as it reminded me off stuff that I must have deliberately/selectively forgotten over the last couple of years.

Basically I’m cutting a few things out that I don’t really value but have a heap of calories, and were taking me well over my RDI. For example, bread/wraps. I’m quite happy to eat a bigger portion of chicken/salad in a bowl than have less chicken/salad in a sandwich or wrap.

Oh yeah, my tequila is 189kj per shot, but a can of VB has 600kj, so instead of 6 VB’s, I can have 19 shots of tequila…

Bread and potatoes are the calorie-adders. Which is not surprising: they’re filling and satisfying.

Myfitnesspal gives you a guide, but if you use it for a while you’ll find that you eat lots of things that aren’t in their index, so that you have to choose the nearest approximation. You can’t rely on it to be strictly accurate, but you can use it to give you a reasonable guide.

There’s often actually quite a lot of accurate information available on the packaging of food that you buy. If you buy a loaf of bread for example, there’s usually something on the packaging telling you what the total calories of the loaf is, and if you divide it by about 15 or 20, depending on how thickly you slice it, you can get a fair idea of how many calories per slice. You often find a “per serve” number on the packaging, but half the time it doesn’t tell you what the serve consists of.

The ones to be very careful of are the apps that calculate how many calories you have burned. You also get that on some machines in the gym. They are always very overstated. But again, if you take it with care, it’s a help.

Ok thanks. I like to try and keep to my energy intake goal and then treat any exercise (extra burning) as a bonus, rather than eat extra because I did a workout. (At least while Im trying to lose weight).

I’ve lost about 2-3kg in the last couple of weeks so hopefully I can keep up the running and careful eating and lose a few more in the next month before stabilising at around 82-83kg.

Given how much less Im eating, I’m surprised I wasn’t heaps bigger than I was, I guess chasing/carrying a 2yo around isn’t sedentary.

I was not enormous to begin with, but I wanted to lose about 6 kg, and I did that in about 3 months, by a combination of eating less and exercising more. The good news is that I’ve kept most of it off (added 1.5 kg back to be honest), by keeping up the exercise. Basically to maintain my weight and and eat three times a day plus fruit in between I need to do 50 minutes of solid cardio exercise a day (80-90% max heart rate). The little bit’s gone back on because i bust the calorie limit maybe once or twice a week.

I would have thought if you’re doing 50 mins cardio a day with that heart rate you should be able to eat whatever you want. You’d be considered highly active with a regime like that. If it was jogging you’d be clocking up over 50km/wk, and you’d expect to be injured pretty soon without rest days.

I’m aiming to eat about 7500kj, and I’m trying to work my way up to running 5km. I did a 10km fun run back in August (time was just over 1 hour) but my training was interupted with some calf strains so I want to gradually increase the distance this time. Yesterday I did 2km then 10 min rest, then did 10x50m uphill sprints with downhill walking recovery, then a 1km walk home, and 3 x 10 pushups. (This was all while taking turns watching my kid at the park with my wife)

I wouldn’t do that every day, and I might have some days off and just try and get out for a 20 min walk or something. Or I might just do the 2km jog. It seems to work for me so far, but like I said I’m still increasing my activity so it might come back to 5km run 3x week. What I’m doing is pretty soft (I know) and would be considered a warm up by a lot of people, but at least it’s an inprovement and it should be sustainable.

Another theory is that working your legs uses a heap of energy, and builds more muscle which in turn burns more calories while they are recovering. So I’ve been doing some lunges and kettlebell swings/squats on odd days. Basically if I don’t have time to get out of the house properly I can get knackered in 5 mins working legs and it’s better than not doing anything - no denying the cardio factor either. Skipping’s good for a quick workout too, haven’t done it for a whle though.

It’s a mixture of running (slowly, about 6 mins/km), the cross-trainer in the gym, walking (10 mins/km – the heart rate is much lower for that) and swimming (I don’t know what the heart rate is but I would guess about 75% from the way it feels). I’ve been running for a long time and it doesn’t seem to cause me many problems.


#3

A reply to: @Shelton 10 regarding QuoteLink

A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink
A reply to: @Shelton 10 regarding QuoteLink
A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink
I had a look at myfitnesspal and used it to count kilojoules for a couple of days. It was a good experience as it reminded me off stuff that I must have deliberately/selectively forgotten over the last couple of years.

Basically I’m cutting a few things out that I don’t really value but have a heap of calories, and were taking me well over my RDI. For example, bread/wraps. I’m quite happy to eat a bigger portion of chicken/salad in a bowl than have less chicken/salad in a sandwich or wrap.

Oh yeah, my tequila is 189kj per shot, but a can of VB has 600kj, so instead of 6 VB’s, I can have 19 shots of tequila…

Bread and potatoes are the calorie-adders. Which is not surprising: they’re filling and satisfying.

Myfitnesspal gives you a guide, but if you use it for a while you’ll find that you eat lots of things that aren’t in their index, so that you have to choose the nearest approximation. You can’t rely on it to be strictly accurate, but you can use it to give you a reasonable guide.

There’s often actually quite a lot of accurate information available on the packaging of food that you buy. If you buy a loaf of bread for example, there’s usually something on the packaging telling you what the total calories of the loaf is, and if you divide it by about 15 or 20, depending on how thickly you slice it, you can get a fair idea of how many calories per slice. You often find a “per serve” number on the packaging, but half the time it doesn’t tell you what the serve consists of.

The ones to be very careful of are the apps that calculate how many calories you have burned. You also get that on some machines in the gym. They are always very overstated. But again, if you take it with care, it’s a help.

Ok thanks. I like to try and keep to my energy intake goal and then treat any exercise (extra burning) as a bonus, rather than eat extra because I did a workout. (At least while Im trying to lose weight).

I’ve lost about 2-3kg in the last couple of weeks so hopefully I can keep up the running and careful eating and lose a few more in the next month before stabilising at around 82-83kg.

Given how much less Im eating, I’m surprised I wasn’t heaps bigger than I was, I guess chasing/carrying a 2yo around isn’t sedentary.

I was not enormous to begin with, but I wanted to lose about 6 kg, and I did that in about 3 months, by a combination of eating less and exercising more. The good news is that I’ve kept most of it off (added 1.5 kg back to be honest), by keeping up the exercise. Basically to maintain my weight and and eat three times a day plus fruit in between I need to do 50 minutes of solid cardio exercise a day (80-90% max heart rate). The little bit’s gone back on because i bust the calorie limit maybe once or twice a week.

I would have thought if you’re doing 50 mins cardio a day with that heart rate you should be able to eat whatever you want. You’d be considered highly active with a regime like that. If it was jogging you’d be clocking up over 50km/wk, and you’d expect to be injured pretty soon without rest days.

I’m aiming to eat about 7500kj, and I’m trying to work my way up to running 5km. I did a 10km fun run back in August (time was just over 1 hour) but my training was interupted with some calf strains so I want to gradually increase the distance this time. Yesterday I did 2km then 10 min rest, then did 10x50m uphill sprints with downhill walking recovery, then a 1km walk home, and 3 x 10 pushups. (This was all while taking turns watching my kid at the park with my wife)

I wouldn’t do that every day, and I might have some days off and just try and get out for a 20 min walk or something. Or I might just do the 2km jog. It seems to work for me so far, but like I said I’m still increasing my activity so it might come back to 5km run 3x week. What I’m doing is pretty soft (I know) and would be considered a warm up by a lot of people, but at least it’s an inprovement and it should be sustainable.

Another theory is that working your legs uses a heap of energy, and builds more muscle which in turn burns more calories while they are recovering. So I’ve been doing some lunges and kettlebell swings/squats on odd days. Basically if I don’t have time to get out of the house properly I can get knackered in 5 mins working legs and it’s better than not doing anything - no denying the cardio factor either. Skipping’s good for a quick workout too, haven’t done it for a whle though.


#4

Try CalorieKing. Its Australian and has specific brands.


#5

A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink

I had a look at myfitnesspal and used it to count kilojoules for a couple of days. It was a good experience as it reminded me off stuff that I must have deliberately/selectively forgotten over the last couple of years.

Basically I’m cutting a few things out that I don’t really value but have a heap of calories, and were taking me well over my RDI. For example, bread/wraps. I’m quite happy to eat a bigger portion of chicken/salad in a bowl than have less chicken/salad in a sandwich or wrap.

Oh yeah, my tequila is 189kj per shot, but a can of VB has 600kj, so instead of 6 VB’s, I can have 19 shots of tequila…

Bread and potatoes are the calorie-adders. Which is not surprising: they’re filling and satisfying.

Myfitnesspal gives you a guide, but if you use it for a while you’ll find that you eat lots of things that aren’t in their index, so that you have to choose the nearest approximation. You can’t rely on it to be strictly accurate, but you can use it to give you a reasonable guide.

There’s often actually quite a lot of accurate information available on the packaging of food that you buy. If you buy a loaf of bread for example, there’s usually something on the packaging telling you what the total calories of the loaf is, and if you divide it by about 15 or 20, depending on how thickly you slice it, you can get a fair idea of how many calories per slice. You often find a “per serve” number on the packaging, but half the time it doesn’t tell you what the serve consists of.

The ones to be very careful of are the apps that calculate how many calories you have burned. You also get that on some machines in the gym. They are always very overstated. But again, if you take it with care, it’s a help.


#6

I had a look at myfitnesspal and used it to count kilojoules for a couple of days. It was a good experience as it reminded me off stuff that I must have deliberately/selectively forgotten over the last couple of years.

Basically I’m cutting a few things out that I don’t really value but have a heap of calories, and were taking me well over my RDI. For example, bread/wraps. I’m quite happy to eat a bigger portion of chicken/salad in a bowl than have less chicken/salad in a sandwich or wrap.

Oh yeah, my tequila is 189kj per shot, but a can of VB has 600kj, so instead of 6 VB’s, I can have 19 shots of tequila…


#7

A reply to: @Shelton 10 regarding QuoteLink

A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink
I had a look at myfitnesspal and used it to count kilojoules for a couple of days. It was a good experience as it reminded me off stuff that I must have deliberately/selectively forgotten over the last couple of years.

Basically I’m cutting a few things out that I don’t really value but have a heap of calories, and were taking me well over my RDI. For example, bread/wraps. I’m quite happy to eat a bigger portion of chicken/salad in a bowl than have less chicken/salad in a sandwich or wrap.

Oh yeah, my tequila is 189kj per shot, but a can of VB has 600kj, so instead of 6 VB’s, I can have 19 shots of tequila…

Bread and potatoes are the calorie-adders. Which is not surprising: they’re filling and satisfying.

Myfitnesspal gives you a guide, but if you use it for a while you’ll find that you eat lots of things that aren’t in their index, so that you have to choose the nearest approximation. You can’t rely on it to be strictly accurate, but you can use it to give you a reasonable guide.

There’s often actually quite a lot of accurate information available on the packaging of food that you buy. If you buy a loaf of bread for example, there’s usually something on the packaging telling you what the total calories of the loaf is, and if you divide it by about 15 or 20, depending on how thickly you slice it, you can get a fair idea of how many calories per slice. You often find a “per serve” number on the packaging, but half the time it doesn’t tell you what the serve consists of.

The ones to be very careful of are the apps that calculate how many calories you have burned. You also get that on some machines in the gym. They are always very overstated. But again, if you take it with care, it’s a help.

Ok thanks. I like to try and keep to my energy intake goal and then treat any exercise (extra burning) as a bonus, rather than eat extra because I did a workout. (At least while Im trying to lose weight).

I’ve lost about 2-3kg in the last couple of weeks so hopefully I can keep up the running and careful eating and lose a few more in the next month before stabilising at around 82-83kg.

Given how much less Im eating, I’m surprised I wasn’t heaps bigger than I was, I guess chasing/carrying a 2yo around isn’t sedentary.


#8

A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink

A reply to: @Shelton 10 regarding QuoteLink
A reply to: @wannabe regarding QuoteLink
I had a look at myfitnesspal and used it to count kilojoules for a couple of days. It was a good experience as it reminded me off stuff that I must have deliberately/selectively forgotten over the last couple of years.

Basically I’m cutting a few things out that I don’t really value but have a heap of calories, and were taking me well over my RDI. For example, bread/wraps. I’m quite happy to eat a bigger portion of chicken/salad in a bowl than have less chicken/salad in a sandwich or wrap.

Oh yeah, my tequila is 189kj per shot, but a can of VB has 600kj, so instead of 6 VB’s, I can have 19 shots of tequila…

Bread and potatoes are the calorie-adders. Which is not surprising: they’re filling and satisfying.

Myfitnesspal gives you a guide, but if you use it for a while you’ll find that you eat lots of things that aren’t in their index, so that you have to choose the nearest approximation. You can’t rely on it to be strictly accurate, but you can use it to give you a reasonable guide.

There’s often actually quite a lot of accurate information available on the packaging of food that you buy. If you buy a loaf of bread for example, there’s usually something on the packaging telling you what the total calories of the loaf is, and if you divide it by about 15 or 20, depending on how thickly you slice it, you can get a fair idea of how many calories per slice. You often find a “per serve” number on the packaging, but half the time it doesn’t tell you what the serve consists of.

The ones to be very careful of are the apps that calculate how many calories you have burned. You also get that on some machines in the gym. They are always very overstated. But again, if you take it with care, it’s a help.

Ok thanks. I like to try and keep to my energy intake goal and then treat any exercise (extra burning) as a bonus, rather than eat extra because I did a workout. (At least while Im trying to lose weight).

I’ve lost about 2-3kg in the last couple of weeks so hopefully I can keep up the running and careful eating and lose a few more in the next month before stabilising at around 82-83kg.

Given how much less Im eating, I’m surprised I wasn’t heaps bigger than I was, I guess chasing/carrying a 2yo around isn’t sedentary.

I was not enormous to begin with, but I wanted to lose about 6 kg, and I did that in about 3 months, by a combination of eating less and exercising more. The good news is that I’ve kept most of it off (added 1.5 kg back to be honest), by keeping up the exercise. Basically to maintain my weight and and eat three times a day plus fruit in between I need to do 50 minutes of solid cardio exercise a day (80-90% max heart rate). The little bit’s gone back on because i bust the calorie limit maybe once or twice a week.


#9

All good! You just reminded me I should go for a swim every week too, thanks.


#10

Say bye to bread


#11

Eating less processed foods should help you feel better, have more energy, and possibly lose weight - though I'd say exercise in combination with eating in a generally healthy way would be best for that. 

 

I'm very cynical about diet fads though. Think Paleo is the hunter-gatherer one? Like most diets it probably gives the most benefit to those who are selling books or products promoting them. 


#12

All diets are crap.

All.


#13

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH

 

- megz


#14

I've never done a diet before and never thought it would be sustainable...but have recently cut out reliance on breads/gluten, stopped drinking during the week and am mainly eating organic. Also only cooking with Coconut oil or butter. Feeling much better. 


#15

Put down the fork and go for a walk!!!


#16

Lay off the donuts you fat bastards.


#17

Atkins diet is a quick way to lose weight but you feel out of energy MOST of the time.


#18

The ‘Don’t eat carbs’ diet is great, but you will need to take up colonic irrigation in your spare time.


#19

Lay off the donuts you fat bastards.


Paleonuts

#20

I'm on the "eat less, move more" diet. It's working.

 

Best part is that I didn't have to pay for a book or DVD telling me how to do it.