Marijuana legalisation


#1

http://edition.cnn.com/2014/01/03/us/marijuana-laws-united-states/

 

 

(CNN) -- In an office run from his Massachusetts home, William Downing is part of a burgeoning national pro-pot movement emboldened by the approval of recreational marijuana laws in Colorado and Washington.

 

"I'm a believer, as The Monkees said," Downing said, a reference to a pop-rock band from an era when the thought of marijuana legalization was all but unimaginable.

 

Downing is treasurer of the group Bay State Repeal in Massachusetts, which already has dozens of medical marijuana dispensaries and decriminalized possession of small amounts of the drug. Now, Downing and others are pushing for full legalization of recreational marijuana by making the case to state voters during a proposed 2016 ballot initiative.

 

"The essence of what's happening is that people are getting educated," Downing said. "People are learning. The rest of the nation is finding out that they have been lied to about cannabis by their government for many decades."

 

This week, Colorado became the first state to sell marijuana for recreational use. Hundreds of buyers waited in line for hours to be a part of opening-day history. Sales were brisk.

 

Now, Colorado's historic legalization policy is being touted as a springboard for the other states.

 

In 2012, Colorado voters approved the sale of recreational marijuana, as did voters in Washington state. But Colorado is the first to have the pot shops up and running under regulations recently established by state and local governments. Colorado voters' approval in effect amended the state's constitution to allow for the retail sale of recreational pot. The state already allowed medical marijuana.

 

The entire state is not implementing the law, however. A community can decide not to allow the shops, and in fact, most areas of the state have not, including communities such as Greeley and Colorado Springs.

In November, Portland, Maine, followed Washington and Colorado's lead and legalized recreational use of the drug, while the Michigan cities of Lansing, Jackson and Ferndale resoundingly voted to let people older than 21 possess an ounce of marijuana on private property.

 

"We're going to set an example for the rest of the nation and the rest of the world," said Mason Tvert of the Marijuana Policy Project, the Washington, D.C.-based group that was the largest financial backer of the Colorado effort.

Tvert challenged media accounts that described Colorado's new pot law as an experiment.

"In fact, the experiment was marijuana prohibition, and that experiment failed," he said.

Advocates are pushing for recreational marijuana laws in Alaska, which could become the third state with such laws, Tvert said. And a campaign could start in Oregon this year or in 2016. In addition, pro-recreational marijuana Initiatives are expected in six other states in 2016: Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana and Nevada, according to Tvert.

 

Public opinion on legalization has changed drastically since the 1960s. There has been an unprecedented spike in approval ratings in the last year, reaching 58%, according to a recent Gallup Poll. The number marks a 10% increase since Colorado and Washington voted to legalize pot, "and the legal momentum shows no sign of abating," according to Gallup.

 

Opponents of marijuana legalization say there are serious health consequences, and argue the drug is often a gateway to more harmful, addictive substances.

 

In addition to Colorado and Washington, 18 otherstates and the District of Columbia allow some legal use of marijuana, primarily for medicinal purposes.

 

In Massachusetts, Downing and other activists hope to follow Colorado's lead in the next two years.

Massachusetts voters have twice supported ballot measures aimed at easing restrictions on marijuana.

In 2008, Massachusetts voters approved a ballot question decriminalizing possession of up to an ounce of pot, making it instead a civil offense punishable by a $100 fine. In 2012, Massachusetts overwhelmingly approved a ballot question allowing for up to 35 medical marijuana dispensaries around the state.

 

Pro-marijuana initiatives sprouting nationwide are more than a sign of a change in political attitude, Downing said.

 

"The momentum has to do with an understanding that cannabis is a far safer medicine and recreational substance," he said.

This follows Uruguay being the first nation to legalise about a month ago from memory


#2

Jealous


#3

Stealth Bomber ripping into a massive spliff as I type.


#4

About ■■■■■■■ time this started happening.


#5

drugs are bad mmmmmmmmmmmmkkkkkkkaaaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyy


#6

About ******* time this started happening.


Not to be inflammatory at all but could you explain why it's a good thing? I remember a few years back a lot of noise being made about decriminalisation and that had merit but from a purely scientific point of view I'm not convinced the evidence supports legalisation. My knowledge is very sketchy and views based on studies mainly related to mental health but I also remember reading something about a link to lung cancer.

#7

Drug that makes you loud, aggressive, violent and stupid = good legal drug.

 

Drug that makes you sit on your couch and not bother another living soul = bad drug. 


#8

 

About ******* time this started happening.


Not to be inflammatory at all but could you explain why it's a good thing? I remember a few years back a lot of noise being made about decriminalisation and that had merit but from a purely scientific point of view I'm not convinced the evidence supports legalisation. My knowledge is very sketchy and views based on studies mainly related to mental health but I also remember reading something about a link to lung cancer.

 

If you're not hurting someone, why ban it?


#9

I think there’s a pretty good argument that it’s much less harmful, and much less socially destructive, than alcohol, and does less harm to you in moderation than tobacco, but if we knew as much about alcohol and tobacco before they took such a hold in society, we’d probably ban them both too.

I’ve known 3 or 4 guys who’ve destroyed their brains on grass, but I’ve known quite a few who shouldn’t ever be allowed to drink either.


#10

I think there's a pretty good argument that it's much less harmful, and much less socially destructive, than alcohol, and does less harm to you in moderation than tobacco, but if we knew as much about alcohol and tobacco before they took such a hold in society, we'd probably ban them both too.
I've known 3 or 4 guys who've destroyed their brains on grass, but I've known quite a few who shouldn't ever be allowed to drink either.


Sadly this last part is too true. It's a pretty bad drug in some respects. I can destroy lives and be as addictive as many other things in life. I would hate to see it legalised in this country.
The yanks are ■■■ about, but it will allow them to tax and control the issue rather than the cartels taking all the profits.

#11

I thought I read that while it is pretty likely to make people who are slightly schizophrenic (or genetically susceptible to schizophrenia) go full bore... it doesn't have any significant effect on otherwise healthy people.

Could be wrong, I ripped a cone afterwards so I can't remember much about it.


#12

I think there's a pretty good argument that it's much less harmful, and much less socially destructive, than alcohol, and does less harm to you in moderation than tobacco, but if we knew as much about alcohol and tobacco before they took such a hold in society, we'd probably ban them both too.
I've known 3 or 4 guys who've destroyed their brains on grass, but I've known quite a few who shouldn't ever be allowed to drink either.

Pretty much my views on it.  The way we've handled tobacco & alcohol shouldn't be a roadmap for future vices.

 

Would I be wrong in saying that we pretty much have a form a legalised use of pot already?  Does anyone actually ever get arrested & charged for possession of a personal qty? 


#13

I thought I read that while it is pretty likely to make people who are slightly schizophrenic (or genetically susceptible to schizophrenia) go full bore... it doesn't have any significant effect on otherwise healthy people.
Could be wrong, I ripped a cone afterwards so I can't remember much about it.


Seen enough personally to think it impacts everyone.
What's worse is the stuff they are selling is probably grown super strength in a laboratory, as opposed to some low grade stuff you get at the pub. Who knows what's gonna happen

#14

If noting else it should be legalised for the potential taxation incomes...


#15

This could explain why we do our pre season training there.

On a related note, half of Blitz have offered their services to the club for next years trip.


#16

tumblr_mkhta6GGjy1s5rsdao1_400.jpg


#17

 

About ******* time this started happening.


Not to be inflammatory at all but could you explain why it's a good thing? I remember a few years back a lot of noise being made about decriminalisation and that had merit but from a purely scientific point of view I'm not convinced the evidence supports legalisation. My knowledge is very sketchy and views based on studies mainly related to mental health but I also remember reading something about a link to lung cancer.

 

I read about it a bit and the main arguments for legalisation:

1. It will cut a lot of cartels and organised crime off at the knees as they form the foundation of their income from selling weed. Employing kids as peddlers too

2. It may be more healthy as by making it legal you have it only for 18 and over as opposed to a corner dealer who will sell to anyone (whether you agree with this point or not is another story)

3. Administrative and bureaucratic reasons where someone on parole would get thrown inside for getting caught with a joint, and even moreso the resources and mainly money that goes into prosecuting marijuana related offences.

4. The main one is that it has scientifically been proven as both less addictive and less harmful than Alcohol. I presume Tobacco too but I don't know.

 

And then the main reasons against are that it's hard or perhaps impossible to test for at say a booze bus situation, and that it's a "gateway drug". Personally I'd say some slapper who's had a litre of Vodka would be more suggestible to some other drugs than someone who's high but yeah that's what they say. I also think removing the illegality of it takes away from a lot of the "gateway drug" factor.


#18

About ******* time this started happening.


Not to be inflammatory at all but could you explain why it's a good thing? I remember a few years back a lot of noise being made about decriminalisation and that had merit but from a purely scientific point of view I'm not convinced the evidence supports legalisation. My knowledge is very sketchy and views based on studies mainly related to mental health but I also remember reading something about a link to lung cancer.
I read about it a bit and the main arguments for legalisation:
1. It will cut a lot of cartels and organised crime off at the knees as they form the foundation of their income from selling weed. Employing kids as peddlers too
2. It may be more healthy as by making it legal you have it only for 18 and over as opposed to a corner dealer who will sell to anyone (whether you agree with this point or not is another story)
3. Administrative and bureaucratic reasons where someone on parole would get thrown inside for getting caught with a joint, and even moreso the resources and mainly money that goes into prosecuting marijuana related offences.
4. The main one is that it has scientifically been proven as both less addictive and less harmful than Alcohol. I presume Tobacco too but I don't know.
 
And then the main reasons against are that it's hard or perhaps impossible to test for at say a booze bus situation, and that it's a "gateway drug". Personally I'd say some slapper who's had a litre of Vodka would be more suggestible to some other drugs than someone who's high but yeah that's what they say. I also think removing the illegality of it takes away from a lot of the "gateway drug" factor.

Thankyou.
Considered answer. I now need some time to consider it. ;-)

#19

Pot is a hell of a lot tamer than the synthetic legal highs you can buy here.


#20

 

And then the main reasons against are that it's hard or perhaps impossible to test for at say a booze bus situation, and that it's a "gateway drug". Personally I'd say some slapper who's had a litre of Vodka would be more suggestible to some other drugs than someone who's high but yeah that's what they say. I also think removing the illegality of it takes away from a lot of the "gateway drug" factor.

 

I'm going to try and not buy into this thread ..... fair chance it'll do my head in. But ......... this whole "gateway drug" thing is just preposterous. Which rabid loony came up with that? Because in a country like Australia/America etc the "gateway drug," if there were such a thing, would be alcohol. That's where everyone starts.