Political Correctness


#1588

He should try making the audience laugh.

No idea what this dude’s background is in comedy (SNL pay ■■■■ all and churn through writers every year, that credit doesn’t necessarily translate to stardom): but that’s an absolute horror show of a gig.


#1589

You are making the assumption perhaps that heterosexuality was my first choice.

I reckon I became sexually aware at about 5 or 6; and I submit as you have choice, you can change your mind.


#1590

I did.
But okay.
How old were you when you decided to be gay?


#1591

image


#1592

I kinda disagree with that last part.

The late Patrice O’Neil made a really interesting point about this which I’ll butcher in the paraphrasing:

Somebody who makes a joke that is funny, and somebody who makes a joke that isn’t, are both coming from the same place. Because something comes out not funny, it doesn’t suddenly become a statement. It’s still a joke, it’s just a bad / unsuccessful one.

But on the overall point… Comedy, and particularly non-PC comedy, is thriving at the moment, and it’s thriving because of the large social Political Correctness movement. Comedy has to have something to push back against, and it’s got plenty at the moment. Plus, at all the festivals, the Dirty Shows are the most popular at the moment.

It’s the non-PC comics who are doing well out of all this, poxy college gigs aside. (Which have always been sh*t anyway.)

He is past his prime now, but Nick Di Paolo was pretty good in his day.


#1593

I appreciate your point, and agree that good comedy, through the skill of the comedian, puts the audience on the spot and leads them to consider things they would not normally want to face - that’s what the silliness and the laughter is designed to do. That is what comedy is all about!!

The thing is though, individuals in the audience will have had different experiences and therefore will react differently. That has always been the case. Some will find what is being said ‘offensive’ which to me is code for "I don’t want to face this because it is taboo in my world’. It’s their job to deal with that, not the comedian.

Some will find it ‘edgy’ in either a negative or positive way because it makes them think/feel and move beyond boring. So to me I believe offensive and edgy are just at different points in a continuum of possible reactions to a comedian’s proposition.

On the topic of conservative political commentary, I think you are really over-generalising. Being a conservative comedian does not automatically mean you are arrogant and bullying. And what about all the late-night talk show hosts - all of them left-wing. They are one-dimensional, damning and act superior in their comedy

I’ve never subscribed to the ‘punching down’ theory. That is a label that is now being used for ‘edgy’ comedy that some people find ‘offensive’. I don’t see why anything can’t be made fun of - because as you say - it’s about asking uncomfortable questions about everything isn’t it?


#1594

Did you listen to Opie & Anthony? All the comedians you have mentioned were regulars on that show, almost built their fanbase from there:

Bill Burr
Nick Di Paolo
Patrice O’Neal


#1595

On the topic of conservative political commentary, I think you are really over-generalising. Being a conservative comedian does not automatically mean you are arrogant and bullying.

Not what I’m saying. The audience may perceive it as that if you throw your hat in on that side.
And it would have to take a comparatively better comedian to make conservative material work, because you’re picking that side.

And what about all the late-night talk show hosts - all of them left-wing. They are one-dimensional, damning and act superior in their comedy
TV’s a tooootally different medium to standup. No audience to deal with. Not all of them are necessarily comedians either, and most of the material’s written for them.

I’ve never subscribed to the ‘punching down’ theory. That is a label that is now being used for ‘edgy’ comedy that some people find ‘offensive’. I don’t see why anything can’t be made fun of - because as you say - it’s about asking uncomfortable questions about everything isn’t it?

Uncomfortable is different to just being “edgy”. It needs the insight.
otherwise it’s just being mean/rude for the sake of it.

I’m not saying people shouldn’t try. I just think it’s going to be extraordinarily hard. And I haven’t seen it work.

TBH it may have to do with the psychology of socialism and humanism, than actual politics per se. Conservative “wisdom” essentially quashes social empathy - you’re responsible for your own destiny.
Comedy relies on empathy. If you’re not willing to stand in someone’s shoes, and get drawn into the joke, you’re that ■■■■ up the front with crossed arms and a scowl while everyone else laughs.

Maybe?
Dunno. It’s late.


#1596

Agree to disagree.


#1597

What’s your theory on why no-one’s really made it work, then?
(Other than a “the lefties control the world” conspiracy)


#1598

A bit, but I find both Opie and Anthony really annoying. (Jim Norten is funny as fark though.)

There are some ripper old clips on YouTube.


#1599

It has always been the case that the entertainment industry is very liberal, you would struggle to find someone who doesn’t agree with that. Don’t you find it interesting that every single Late Night talk show host is a liberal, some even contributed to Hillary’s presidential campaign.

I used to religiously watch Jon Stewart, David Letterman and Craig Ferguson (Who were all liberals) when they were on. I don’t care what your political views are, if I know you’re more interested in making me laugh, rather than jamming your beliefs down my throat. But I truly believe some of these show’s number one concern isn’t entertainment, it’s preaching.

Think of it this way, if they hired an openly conservative host, think of how many potential viewers they could get, you don’t think conservative people watch late night tv? They could corner the market. They simply don’t want it on their airwaves.

Jimmy Fallon gets criticised because he tries to stay away from politics on his show and make content most people can enjoy. Which at the end of the day, was what those shows were originally designed for (Something light and funny to watch while you’re trying to fall asleep).

These are some conservatives who have made it in comedy:

Tim Allen: I think he was the highest paid celebrity of the nineties (Toy Story, Home Improvement, other movies). He recently had his new sitcom that was rating really well cancelled, because he was conservative and the show was about a conservative family. It just got picked up again on another channel.

Norm Macdonald: Been in trouble many times in the past 25 years because of his comedy. Was fired from SNL in the 90’s for making so many Clinton/Lewinsky and OJ Simpson jokes. Has a show on Netflix at the moment that nearly got cancelled before it even aired.

Nick DiPaolo: Probably not very well known of here, but is a very successful stand-up comedian. Recently got fired from his Radio show because of an offensive tweet.

People like Jay Leno, Joe Rogan, Adam Carolla and Colin Quinn. I can’t completely confirm if they are or are not conservative, but they certainly have conservative views.

I’m going to bed now, I’m farking exhausted. I’ll check-in tomorrow.


#1600

I don’t think it holds up that comedians go to town on Trump because he’s Republican.
They do it because he’s ridiculous (and he gives them so much material).
I don’t think there’s a lot of material in Bush Sr or McCain.
There is in Bush Jr and even…whatsisname…Sean Spicer.


#1601

It’s not about left or right.

Political comedy like any politically based art, will poke,prod or attack the status quo.

Conservatism is about protecting/celebrating the status quo.

It’s impossible to attack and protect the status quo at the same time.


#1602

Clinton would have supplied a lot of material.

Obama to a lesser degree because stuff against him was often motivated by other factors.

One right-wing comedian I used to see on Leno was Dennis Miller.


#1603

I’m not a fan of political comedy for a number of reasons. The first and foremost is that it’s rarely, if ever, funny. Comedy is supposed to make me laugh, and if it doesn’t do that, or at least be obviously trying to do that, then so far as I’m concerned it’s not comedy. And I’m really not interested in what some so-called comedian thinks about politics or particular politicians. I like political discussions as much as anyone, but I like them when they’re reasoned and thoughtful and they acknowledge and consider other points of view. Political comedians don’t do that.


#1604

I’m exactly the opposite.
Have absolutely no interest in hearing what any politician has to say, since it is likely to be bullshiit weasel-talk to appease constituents, however, I’m always happy to hear a comedic spin on things, whether it actually makes me laugh or not. Besides, comedians are invariably more intelligent than pollies.


#1605

They seem to have a few things in common, when you put it like that.
Lots of travel, away from home all the time, going around talking to people, copping abuse from anyone who feels like they have an opinion.


#1606

Yes.
Except one group - is often funny, and brings laughter and happiness to the audience.


#1607

I’ve only picked up on Shaun Micallef’s Mad as Hell fairly recently. I quite enjoy that, mainly because they ridicule pollies who need to be ridiculed.