Politics


#1

Support for Turnbull slumps as Labor and Coalition deadlocked in Newspoll

Coalition and Labor tied at 50% each on two-party preferred basis as support for the prime minister dips from 53% in January to 48% in latest poll

Shalailah Medhora

Monday 22 February 2016 06.57

The honeymoon appears to be over for Malcolm Turnbull with the latest poll showing the Coalition and Labor are deadlocked and the prime minister’s approval rating tumbling.

The Newspoll, published in the Australian on Monday, shows the Coalition’s primary vote has slumped three points to 43% since January, the lowest level seen since Tony Abbott was ousted five months ago.

Labor’s primary vote has jumped one point to 35% in the same period.

In two-party preferred terms, the Coalition and Labor are tied at 50% each, a sharp drop for the government from a six percentage point lead it had maintained since November.

A series of ministerial resignations and oustings and confusion over the government’s policy direction has undermined the Coalition’s standing in the polls.

In late December, former cities minister, Jamie Briggs, resigned from the ministry over inappropriate conduct involving a female diplomatic staffer, and embattled frontbencher Mal Brough stood aside pending an investigation into his role in the Peter Slipper affair.

Brough resigned from the ministry prior to February’s reshuffle, which was expedited by the retirement of Nationals leader and deputy prime minister, Warren Truss, and the trade minister, Andrew Robb.

Stuart Robert was dumped from the ministry at the same time, after it was revealed that he travelled in an unofficial capacity to China for the signing of a mining deal with the owner of a company in which he had holdings.

The scandals have taken a toll on support for the prime minister, with 48% of voters satisfied with Turnbull’s performance, down from 53% in January.

But Turnbull still holds a dominating lead over the opposition leader, Bill Shorten, in the preferred prime minister stakes, leading 55% to 21%. Shorten’s standing has improved significantly since hitting a near-record low of 14% in early December.

Some 47% of those polled were in favour of Labor’s policy of ending negative gearing for established homes, with 31% opposed and 22% undecided.

Support among Labor voters was 60% with only 40% of Coalition voters endorsing the move.

The treasurer, Scott Morrison, has rubbished Labor’s proposal to restrict negative gearing to new homes, saying it amounts to “selling the public a unicorn”.

The government has yet to announce its economic policy leading up to this year’s federal election, after Turnbull comprehensively dumped plans to raise the goods and services tax to 15%.


Pauline's Stunt
#2
At least it wasn't copied from Slipper's diary. Ashby, Mal Brough's mate, is her campaign manager.
All the LOLz.

#3
Agree with @JBOMBER - compulsory voting needs to be done away with, basically every other first world democracy does not compel its citizens to vote.

What are the benefits of compulsory voting anyway? I’ve yet to hear any legitimate reasons.

The need to appeal to the undecided or not-very-involved voter prevents the major parties becoming dominated by their own extremists.

When voting is optional, winning elections becomes less about winning over undecideds and more about making sure you get more of your fanatics to the polling booths than the other mob manages of theirs. The Republican Party in the USA is exhibit A, B, and C of where this road leads. In Aust, the local branches and even the party machines can be tempted to preselecte loonies, but said loonies then have to run the gauntlet of an actual election. When voting is optional, there’s no need to nominate reasonable people at all. You can nominate a looney, have him preselected by his local branch of loonies, and then elected by the votes if those, say, 25% of the population who are rusted on to your party or who are loonily inclined in your direction. And because the same dynamic is probably at work on the other side of politics too, regular non-loonies have nobody to vote for and stay home. Elections become a contest of looney vs looney, and politics inevitably becomes even more partisan and posturing, and less inclined to sensible negotiation & hard work.

Besides, from a purely principle-based point of view, voting isn’t just a right, it’s a damn duty. Democracy doesn’t ask all that ■■■■■■ much of you, is 15 minutes or so spent filling out a ballot paper really THAT much of a drag?

Some good points, though you place too much emphasis on what happens in the States - they are unique and completely different to other similar Western democracies who go by the Westminster system.

NZ, UK and Canada all have voluntary voting and whilst I can’t speak for the first two, I’ve been living in Canada for > 3 years and just went through a federal election last year. In no way did the election become looney vs looney. In fact it was quite similar to what we’re used to in Australia, the only difference being one nation compels its citizens whilst one does not.

Give me a 60-70% turn out who actually have informed themselves of each party’s key policies et al rather than ill informed, uninterested citizens who only vote because they are forced to do so.


#4
If they had compulsory voting in the US, they would probably never have a republican (as we know them now) Government .. like EVER.

I don’t think without it, you can call the end result democracy.

In fact in it’s true definition, it isn’t.

democracy
dɪˈmɒkrəsi/Submit
noun
a system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives.

Unless you’re under 18, or homeless (as you need proof of physical address to register to vote).

…or criminal, or bankrupt, or…


#5
Its only compulsory to attend. We could submit 3 million votes for Tippa if we wanted.

Potentially no longer when electronically voting is eventually introduced.


#6

If that story is to be believed, we should expect the AFP to undermine future governments that are not it’s preferred choice. What the Hell is going on? I’m actually concerned after reading that.


#7

At least it wasn’t copied from Slipper’s diary. Ashby, Mal Brough’s mate, is her campaign manager.


#8
lol good one...

Pauline Hanson’s One Nation Party has copied slabs of text from the internet for some of its policies — including from Wikipedia.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-11/pauline-hanson-sections-of-party-policies-lifted-from-internet/7587652

One Notion


#9

Do Au Pairs have a union?


#10
How often would she use it on you?

lol

all the time


#11
If they had compulsory voting in the US, they would probably never have a republican (as we know them now) Government .. like EVER.

I don’t think without it, you can call the end result democracy.

In fact in it’s true definition, it isn’t.

democracy
dɪˈmɒkrəsi/Submit
noun
a system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives.

Unless you’re under 18, or homeless (as you need proof of physical address to register to vote).


#12

How often would she use it on you?


#13

Hmm, and I thought you two were brothers.


#14
Looks like Anne Aly will win Cowan. Goodbye invisible man.

Something dodgy went on.

They piled some Greens votes in the Liberals votes pile. Attention to detail seemingly isn’t a strong suit over there.


Like stuff ups are exclusively a WA experience, you nincompoop.

Well you are all behind the times so it isn’t hard to imagine…

oh and great word usage, haven’t heard that one in some time. It was my mother’s favourite word.


#15
Looks like Anne Aly will win Cowan. Goodbye invisible man.

Something dodgy went on.

They piled some Greens votes in the Liberals votes pile. Attention to detail seemingly isn’t a strong suit over there.


Like stuff ups are exclusively a WA experience, you nincompoop.

#16

Its only compulsory to attend. We could submit 3 million votes for Tippa if we wanted.


#17
Looks like Anne Aly will win Cowan. Goodbye invisible man.

Something dodgy went on.

They piled some Greens votes in the Liberals votes pile. Attention to detail seemingly isn’t a strong suit over there.

Regular occurrence in vote counts. They are all usually young and inexperienced, and have been working since 7 am. The pressure to get it done is ridiculous, with scrutineers like me breathing down their necks.

Not worth the money, and so easy to make mistakes.


#18
I can take you back to before 1972 when it was rumored that anyone who had protested loudly about the Vietnam War had a Federal Police dossier on them.

After Gough was elected Jim Cairns and others demanded to see the files, and it was all proved correct.

For those who are too young to remember this phase of our country’s history, this is not only true, but it is very understated. (Surprisingly so for Bacchus).

Because Albert, I think most people would be think it hard to believe that the Federal Cops had files on thousands and of people, with photos, phone taps and evidence from neighbours, friends and relatives. More like East Germany.


#19
Here is a little known fact that everyone should be aware of in this election campaign:

ATO bombshell is a fresh blow to property market (The Australian 19/5/16)

Key points: Property owners are about to get a terrible shock when they deal in property valued at more than $2m. From July 1 2016, the rules for transacting dwellings and commercial property worth
more than $2m will change dramatically. All sellers of $2m plus properties will be classified as overseas investors unless they get a special tax clearance. That means that all buyers of $2m plus properties must deduct 10% from the purchase price and pay that amount to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) unless the seller has a tax clearance.

My informant says: Anybody else miss this one? Nasty stuff from our friends at the ATO. Per previous article and along with Victorian state stamp duty and land tax hikes, effective same date for non-residents, it seems the Tories are doing all they can to kick the legs from under the property market. They will be sorry when stamp duties suffer and I hope some sensible voter backlash. Surely this is all going too far?

My take: Assuming this report is correct (and the financially astute BBers may be able to conform or refute it) if the Libs are instituting this on $2M properties now (which is not that much considering prices in inner MEL and SYD) then no-one’s house is safe from being taxed by this devious method.

Anyone of a certain age will remember the Murdoch press running on election day in the Whitlam years with that “Labor will tax the family home” headline on election day - too late for any response refuting the lie.

Surely Rupert will be consistent and command a huge media campaign against the Tories over this.

That is exactly like having to deduct tax from what you are paying someone who does not have an ABN. So really, how hard would it be to prove you are not an overseas buyer? I think you have latched on to a piece of gristle in an otherwise tasty bit of blade steak.


#20
Looks like Anne Aly will win Cowan. Goodbye invisible man.

Something dodgy went on.

They piled some Greens votes in the Liberals votes pile. Attention to detail seemingly isn’t a strong suit over there.