The Guitar Thread


#1

Couldn’t find one so starting one. Please merge if there is.

So, recently I’ve decided to teach myself. I come from a fairly musical family. Father, brother and sister all play and have/are performing live on and off. For some reason it never stuck with me growing up. Always had my head in books and getting up to certain forms of no good (usually with people who were budding musos). I feel like I’ve got a bit of flair for it. Strumming technique comes fairly naturally. I’m at the stage of getting more familiar with barre chords which seems to be going alright. I suppose I’m wondering what songs people remember that made them feel like they took another step in proficiency. I’m not really at the point of mastering arpreggio yet or shredding or anything like that. Yes, I know Ramones do almost everything in barre chords and I like Ramones.

Also, what guitars do people own? What’s your favorite to play at the moment? I have an EJ-200 and an Epiphone SG. Want to get a Strat and a Tele. And a Les Paul. Probably only going to go with the lower shelf stuff as I can’t see myself needing anything over $1200. But, who knows… I’ve got an iRig which drives the family crazy because I tune out and can’t hear them. Ironically, it hasn’t solved the problem of being noisy and annoying people. I guess the people next door don’t know how lucky they are.


#2

I suppose I’m wondering what songs people remember that made them feel like they took another step in proficiency

As a strictly rhythm guitarist, that never had any desire to be a lead one, . The song Monkey Wrench, and then everyone of them on the album Colour & The shape.

Learning to play them, and then play AND sing them, changed everything.

Daves chords, and their usage, and his writing from a percussion perspective, with lyrics so often syncopated with the adventurous rhythm figures he plays on it, were/are, different to anything else I’d learnt or played.

It was like opening a door in my brain.


#3

LES PAUL book at local library

The Gibson Les Paul : the illustrated story of the guitar that changed rock


#4
I suppose I'm wondering what songs people remember that made them feel like they took another step in proficiency

As a strictly rhythm guitarist, that never had any desire to be a lead one, . The song Monkey Wrench, and then everyone of them on the album Colour & The shape.

Learning to play them, and then play AND sing them, changed everything.

Daves chords, and their usage, and his writing from a percussion perspective, with lyrics so often syncopated with the adventurous rhythm figures he plays on it, were/are, different to anything else I’d learnt or played.

It was like opening a door in my brain.

Foos. Hadn’t thought of them! Thanks BSD.


#5

I have many guitars.
My first was (is) a 12-string Eko I bought with my first few pays when I was 14. I had been staring at it lovingly and lustingly for a year., walking by it in the window of a music store, for a year prior. I still have it in pristine condition, in it’s original brown vinyl cover :slight_smile:

I taught myself guitar as a teen. No internet, no books - just picking out tunes at first, and then doing something I used to call ‘harmonies’ which I later found out where chords, hahaha.

I dropped guitar for sax in my 20’s and taught myself after a few initial lessons. But when kids came along, I stopped as it was too loud despite literally putting a sock in it, and I became too busy and forgot about making music, instead just listening to it.

I picked up guitar again about 8 years ago and did a fair bit of recording, but have hardly touched a guitar in 2 years. Life is too busy again and I’m building up a business. I’ll get back to it.

Songs that were steps - Creedance, Pink Floyd stuff, etc. There are many simple tunes out there to perfect. What do you like playing/listening to?


#6

I’d say learn stuff that you enjoy listening to. Without knowing your taste in music, I can’t really recommend anything.

Check out the site Songsterr. It’s got 500,000+ tabs, plenty of good arrangements with other instruments (for backing), and it’s free with basic functionality (you have to pay extra to loop parts, slow them down etc). It’s also available as an app which can be played concurrently when you’re using your iRig. By the way, what app do you use with your iRig?


#7

I can tell you my experience which would be greatly different to most.

I started guitar lessons when I was 10…lessons is a bit of overkill, I had a few lessons, forgot to go to many, then quit in shame.
My cheap acoustic guitar with nylon strings got a little bit of use through my teenage years, mainly plucking notes along to my favourite songs with little accuracy, but I didn’t care, I was a rockstar! That was until my mother, walking into my filthy state of a room, accidentally stepped on the neck of that guitar and snapped it in half. I reassured her it didn’t care but secretly I was devastated.

It wasn’t until I was in my 30’s I went and bought a cheap electric fender clone and amp. I tried to learn again via youtube, and a program called guitar pro, basically a guitar tab program. Unfortunately I found that difficult to follow, and again, my guitar gathered dust in the corner.

A few more years past and a saw a review on an console game called rocksmith. This changed my guitaring life. Games I can understand, and a simple interface made me comfortable picking up the guitar again. I’m now in my 40’s and at this point I would call myself an very amateur player. But one thing it’s made me is a consistent player. Instead of chucking the guitar in the corner for a year, I find myself playing most days, at very least pining to. Being able to jump straight in and play the songs you really want to play at your own pace is a great advantage over other learning aides.

I’m hoping to upgrade my guitar to a half decent one this year, the cheap fender guitar i still have is ■■■■■■ horrible. Too much string action, very noticeable fret buzz, and just really difficult to get a smooth sound out of.

My only advice to those who may want to try the rocksmith route is to combine it with some lessons with a professional, particularly at the beginning. I have no doubt I have picked up and nurtured some horrendous habits sitting on a couch in front of a big screen.


#8
I have many guitars. My first was (is) a 12-string Eko I bought with my first few pays when I was 14. I had been staring at it lovingly and lustingly for a year., walking by it in the window of a music store, for a year prior. I still have it in pristine condition, in it's original brown vinyl cover :)

I taught myself guitar as a teen. No internet, no books - just picking out tunes at first, and then doing something I used to call ‘harmonies’ which I later found out where chords, hahaha.

I dropped guitar for sax in my 20’s and taught myself after a few initial lessons. But when kids came along, I stopped as it was too loud despite literally putting a sock in it, and I became too busy and forgot about making music, instead just listening to it.

I picked up guitar again about 8 years ago and did a fair bit of recording, but have hardly touched a guitar in 2 years. Life is too busy again and I’m building up a business. I’ll get back to it.

Songs that were steps - Creedance, Pink Floyd stuff, etc. There are many simple tunes out there to perfect. What do you like playing/listening to?

Yeah, love Floyd. The Who, Beatles, most 70s and 80s punk, REM, Pixies, Nirvana, Queens of the Stone Age, Stone Temple Pilots, that kind of stuff.


#9
I'd say learn stuff that you enjoy listening to. Without knowing your taste in music, I can't really recommend anything.

Check out the site Songsterr. It’s got 500,000+ tabs, plenty of good arrangements with other instruments (for backing), and it’s free with basic functionality (you have to pay extra to loop parts, slow them down etc). It’s also available as an app which can be played concurrently when you’re using your iRig. By the way, what app do you use with your iRig?

Thanks WD. Will check it out. I’m using AmpliTube with the iRig. Just the free version. Very tempted to buy it all though.


#10
I can tell you my experience which would be greatly different to most.

I started guitar lessons when I was 10…lessons is a bit of overkill, I had a few lessons, forgot to go to many, then quit in shame.
My cheap acoustic guitar with nylon strings got a little bit of use through my teenage years, mainly plucking notes along to my favourite songs with little accuracy, but I didn’t care, I was a rockstar! That was until my mother, walking into my filthy state of a room, accidentally stepped on the neck of that guitar and snapped it in half. I reassured her it didn’t care but secretly I was devastated.

It wasn’t until I was in my 30’s I went and bought a cheap electric fender clone and amp. I tried to learn again via youtube, and a program called guitar pro, basically a guitar tab program. Unfortunately I found that difficult to follow, and again, my guitar gathered dust in the corner.

A few more years past and a saw a review on an console game called rocksmith. This changed my guitaring life. Games I can understand, and a simple interface made me comfortable picking up the guitar again. I’m now in my 40’s and at this point I would call myself an very amateur player. But one thing it’s made me is a consistent player. Instead of chucking the guitar in the corner for a year, I find myself playing most days, at very least pining to. Being able to jump straight in and play the songs you really want to play at your own pace is a great advantage over other learning aides.

I’m hoping to upgrade my guitar to a half decent one this year, the cheap fender guitar i still have is ■■■■■■ horrible. Too much string action, very noticeable fret buzz, and just really difficult to get a smooth sound out of.

My only advice to those who may want to try the rocksmith route is to combine it with some lessons with a professional, particularly at the beginning. I have no doubt I have picked up and natured some horrendous habits sitting on a couch in front of a big screen.

Cheap is usually pretty nasty, but very very few guitars are perfect straight from the shop. Every player is different, and needs an instrument that is slightly different. When you get a decent one, get it set up properly. There are other places/people around, but t my mind this is the numero uno. http://www.cargillcustomguitars.com.au/index.html


#11
I can tell you my experience which would be greatly different to most.

I started guitar lessons when I was 10…lessons is a bit of overkill, I had a few lessons, forgot to go to many, then quit in shame.
My cheap acoustic guitar with nylon strings got a little bit of use through my teenage years, mainly plucking notes along to my favourite songs with little accuracy, but I didn’t care, I was a rockstar! That was until my mother, walking into my filthy state of a room, accidentally stepped on the neck of that guitar and snapped it in half. I reassured her it didn’t care but secretly I was devastated.

It wasn’t until I was in my 30’s I went and bought a cheap electric fender clone and amp. I tried to learn again via youtube, and a program called guitar pro, basically a guitar tab program. Unfortunately I found that difficult to follow, and again, my guitar gathered dust in the corner.

A few more years past and a saw a review on an console game called rocksmith. This changed my guitaring life. Games I can understand, and a simple interface made me comfortable picking up the guitar again. I’m now in my 40’s and at this point I would call myself an very amateur player. But one thing it’s made me is a consistent player. Instead of chucking the guitar in the corner for a year, I find myself playing most days, at very least pining to. Being able to jump straight in and play the songs you really want to play at your own pace is a great advantage over other learning aides.

I’m hoping to upgrade my guitar to a half decent one this year, the cheap fender guitar i still have is ■■■■■■ horrible. Too much string action, very noticeable fret buzz, and just really difficult to get a smooth sound out of.

My only advice to those who may want to try the rocksmith route is to combine it with some lessons with a professional, particularly at the beginning. I have no doubt I have picked up and natured some horrendous habits sitting on a couch in front of a big screen.

Good story TB. My dad bought me an Ibanez acoustic when I was about 13. I was doing group lessons at school which isn’t exactly ideal when most of the kids were just mucking around at the time. The nut needed cutting down because playing open chords on this thing was like slicing your fingers on razor blades and it made your hand ache way too easily. Didn’t even get to barre chords. It was enough to get me losing interest.


#12
I can tell you my experience which would be greatly different to most.

I started guitar lessons when I was 10…lessons is a bit of overkill, I had a few lessons, forgot to go to many, then quit in shame.
My cheap acoustic guitar with nylon strings got a little bit of use through my teenage years, mainly plucking notes along to my favourite songs with little accuracy, but I didn’t care, I was a rockstar! That was until my mother, walking into my filthy state of a room, accidentally stepped on the neck of that guitar and snapped it in half. I reassured her it didn’t care but secretly I was devastated.

It wasn’t until I was in my 30’s I went and bought a cheap electric fender clone and amp. I tried to learn again via youtube, and a program called guitar pro, basically a guitar tab program. Unfortunately I found that difficult to follow, and again, my guitar gathered dust in the corner.

A few more years past and a saw a review on an console game called rocksmith. This changed my guitaring life. Games I can understand, and a simple interface made me comfortable picking up the guitar again. I’m now in my 40’s and at this point I would call myself an very amateur player. But one thing it’s made me is a consistent player. Instead of chucking the guitar in the corner for a year, I find myself playing most days, at very least pining to. Being able to jump straight in and play the songs you really want to play at your own pace is a great advantage over other learning aides.

I’m hoping to upgrade my guitar to a half decent one this year, the cheap fender guitar i still have is ■■■■■■ horrible. Too much string action, very noticeable fret buzz, and just really difficult to get a smooth sound out of.

My only advice to those who may want to try the rocksmith route is to combine it with some lessons with a professional, particularly at the beginning. I have no doubt I have picked up and natured some horrendous habits sitting on a couch in front of a big screen.

Cheap is usually pretty nasty, but very very few guitars are perfect straight from the shop. Every player is different, and needs an instrument that is slightly different. When you get a decent one, get it set up properly. There are other places/people around, but t my mind this is the numero uno. http://www.cargillcustomguitars.com.au/index.html

Or you can learn to set it up yourself, which is a really good way to get to U/stand your instrument.

Electrics in particular, are pretty ■■■■ easy. Really just need a decent set of allen keys… provided the neck isn’t twisted, and the frets aren’t a decade or more of occasional use old.

■■■■■■ good fun actually.

And plenty of web sites to show you how … and U tube things as well now I imagine.


#13
I'd say learn stuff that you enjoy listening to. Without knowing your taste in music, I can't really recommend anything.

Check out the site Songsterr. It’s got 500,000+ tabs, plenty of good arrangements with other instruments (for backing), and it’s free with basic functionality (you have to pay extra to loop parts, slow them down etc). It’s also available as an app which can be played concurrently when you’re using your iRig. By the way, what app do you use with your iRig?

Thanks WD. Will check it out. I’m using AmpliTube with the iRig. Just the free version. Very tempted to buy it all though.

AmpliTube is really good. I like a similar app called Bias FX. With the iRig and other similar interfaces, the ones that plug into the lightning port are much quieter and clearer than the ones that plug into the headphone jack.

Some other apps I like for playing guitar are AnyTune Pro+ (slow down, loop parts,
change key of songs and other stuff), Drum Beats+ (lots of fun drum beats to play along with) and Loopy HD (intuitive looper for looping guitar and audio). YouTube is a great resource for learning songs now as well.


#14

Only thing I’ve ever envied about an iPhone, was when I discovered that you can record 2 channels at once with it, … but I also think it needed that rig thing … maybe not. Either way the Galaxy S2 would/can do only one.

I’m thinking of “upgrading” to an S3 or 4, … anyone know if they’re able to do so.

Also, I remember the day I found an app that I put on my ■■■■■■ cell phone had multi track recording, with all the effects and functionality as a DAW which I had paid $1000 for 7 years earlier, for $6 fkn dollars, I nearly cried… just incredible.

■■■■■■ excellent for writing whenever/wherever though.


#15
I can tell you my experience which would be greatly different to most.

I started guitar lessons when I was 10…lessons is a bit of overkill, I had a few lessons, forgot to go to many, then quit in shame.
My cheap acoustic guitar with nylon strings got a little bit of use through my teenage years, mainly plucking notes along to my favourite songs with little accuracy, but I didn’t care, I was a rockstar! That was until my mother, walking into my filthy state of a room, accidentally stepped on the neck of that guitar and snapped it in half. I reassured her it didn’t care but secretly I was devastated.

It wasn’t until I was in my 30’s I went and bought a cheap electric fender clone and amp. I tried to learn again via youtube, and a program called guitar pro, basically a guitar tab program. Unfortunately I found that difficult to follow, and again, my guitar gathered dust in the corner.

A few more years past and a saw a review on an console game called rocksmith. This changed my guitaring life. Games I can understand, and a simple interface made me comfortable picking up the guitar again. I’m now in my 40’s and at this point I would call myself an very amateur player. But one thing it’s made me is a consistent player. Instead of chucking the guitar in the corner for a year, I find myself playing most days, at very least pining to. Being able to jump straight in and play the songs you really want to play at your own pace is a great advantage over other learning aides.

I’m hoping to upgrade my guitar to a half decent one this year, the cheap fender guitar i still have is ■■■■■■ horrible. Too much string action, very noticeable fret buzz, and just really difficult to get a smooth sound out of.

My only advice to those who may want to try the rocksmith route is to combine it with some lessons with a professional, particularly at the beginning. I have no doubt I have picked up and natured some horrendous habits sitting on a couch in front of a big screen.

I bought Rocksmith 1 & 2 for me and the kids to learn. For those that don’t know, it’s like Guitar Hero but with a real guitar. Song selection is pretty amazing if you go the DLC route.

I think there was a bit of delay coming through the stereo, so need to set it up direct through tv.

I’ll have to dig it out again give it a try.


#16
I'd say learn stuff that you enjoy listening to. Without knowing your taste in music, I can't really recommend anything.

Check out the site Songsterr. It’s got 500,000+ tabs, plenty of good arrangements with other instruments (for backing), and it’s free with basic functionality (you have to pay extra to loop parts, slow them down etc). It’s also available as an app which can be played concurrently when you’re using your iRig. By the way, what app do you use with your iRig?

Thanks WD. Will check it out. I’m using AmpliTube with the iRig. Just the free version. Very tempted to buy it all though.

AmpliTube is really good. I like a similar app called Bias FX. With the iRig and other similar interfaces, the ones that plug into the lightning port are much quieter and clearer than the ones that plug into the headphone jack.

Some other apps I like for playing guitar are AnyTune Pro+ (slow down, loop parts,
change key of songs and other stuff), Drum Beats+ (lots of fun drum beats to play along with) and Loopy HD (intuitive looper for looping guitar and audio). YouTube is a great resource for learning songs now as well.

Nice. I’ll have a look at those apps. Only spent about $7 on the iRig so might look into others at some stage. Good to know though.

The old man asked me a little while back if I wanted one of his guitar tuners. Showed him my GuitarTuna app and he was blown away. Then he asked how I was figuring out songs and I just said YouTube. Heaps of vids of people showing stuff. Lot of it really useful. He shook his head and said “better than stuffing around with an LP trying to figure things out.”


#17

“better than stuffing around with an LP trying to figure things out.”

Except, it really isn’t, … in a way. Nothing like transcribing, via “Couch chord search” method, for training your ear.
(Except of course, using your computer to loop songs or phrases rather than moving the needle on a record umpteen times.)

Again, … also good fun. And you never forget the song once you’ve done it that way.


#18

I’ve owned lots of guitars over the years & weep when I think of some that I’ve let go. ATM I have three - a 1957 Gretsch Silverjet, a 1962 Gretsch Tennessean and a Nash Telecaster. The Gretsches are original, not re-issues. The Silverjet is my fave, but the Nash is for regular use. The Ramones is as good a place as any to start (punk & bar chords were where I began in the late 70’s). Maybe buy a Beatles songbook for more advanced chords & key changes (I just re-leaned Sexy Sadie & Strawberry Fields) . And play along to some funky stuff (e.g. James Brown) to develop a keener sense of syncopation - I played bass for a bit, which gave me a much better appreciation for rhythm.




#19

Wow. Impressive axes Gnik! Nice tips too. Beatles songbook is a great idea. I don’t mind a bit of funk. Probably need to explore that world a bit more anyway.


#20
"better than stuffing around with an LP trying to figure things out."

Except, it really isn’t, … in a way. Nothing like transcribing, via “Couch chord search” method, for training your ear.
(Except of course, using your computer to loop songs or phrases rather than moving the needle on a record umpteen times.)

Again, … also good fun. And you never forget the song once you’ve done it that way.

I’ll look into the looping thing. I noticed when I went away on holiday for a while and didn’t pick anything up I’d forgotten parts of some songs.