Australian Politics, Mark II


#4765

@reboot doesn’t need me to speak on his behalf but nowhere in his response is he ‘ragging’ on this woman.


#4766

Every time you think the major parties have hit bottom on data and surveillance, they manage to dig even lower.

The data encryption bill will pass tomorrow with Lb and ALP support. The amendments that the ALP promised would ensure balance and privacy amount to carefully refusing the state Commissions Against Corruption access to the encryption backdoors. Jeez, I wonder why? Especially when the legislation is perfectly ok with having the Taxi Directorate or Bankstown City Council snooping on everyone’s secure mail.

Even the ■■■■■■■ parliamentary committee that’s pimping this horrible mess says it should be immediately reviewed. WELL WHY PASS IT IN THE FIRST PLACE THEN?

It’s really depressing now just how nakedly authoritarian both major parties are on ‘security’ issues. They’re both spouting about how this will not compromise privacy. There’e plenty of numpties in parliament, but there are enough moderately competent people on both sides to realise that this is a tissue of lies. And those people will cynically vote for this abortion anyway. On days like this i almost prefer the honest morons.

Reckon there’s a real possibility of, if this becomes law, Apple or someone just saying ‘;nope, we’re not going to compromise the security of every single one of our products just because the Australian parliament is tech-illiterate, so products X, Y, and Z are no longer available in Australia from this day onwards’. We’re a tiny market globally, and the PR would probably make it worth their while…


#4767

You seemed to be, never accused Boot of it.


#4768

She does deserve asylum, and you’d like to think she’d be offered it if she was Hindu.


#4769

Labor and Greens couldn’t block the underwriting of coal power and save the free market from the LNP. Katter votes with the LNP and the rest of the “economic rationalist” independents abstained.


#4770

Or Zoroastrian…


#4771

The US are very keen for this law to pass as they will be able to go through the back door via the 5 Eyes partnership. Something like this wouldn’t and hasn’t flown in the States (which kinda says it all).


#4772

Or Pastafarian…


#4773

What the idiots in this country don’t understand about this is the same back door to data that the government want to put in is going to get exploited by hackers, your personal information, credit cards, all of it becomes incredibly vulnerable to hacking.

We got briefed at work today about it


#4774

How is that any different from now?

(Granted this is the US) - Phone is on the table, we are having a conversation about ‘I wonder who the artists is of this song?’

Phone locked, not even touching it.

Phone lights up with, answer on screen. Our phones totally listen to us, sure it might be under the guise of marketing - but they absolutely mine our data/usage - which is passed onto 3rd parties

Now if the government want to spy on my spicy meme usage on whatsapp - I am cool with that.

For me it kind of makes sense - most of the terrorists are young males who use encrypted services to communicate. I would imagine with the right resources, it would be quite easy to monitor usage and keywords to understand patterns and intercept plans.

Unless I am missing something?


#4775

You are…

Any back door that some munted government employee comes up with will be exploited.

It’s going to be data theft thunder dome, you might think I’m being an alarmist. But I work for Apple, I know what I’m talking about.


#4776

Care to provide a option for law enforcement and security agencies to do their job when criminals are using encrypted messenges?


#4777

I know one thing for sure - it’s not to encroach on my privacy ffs


#4778

It’s not even the privacy.

It’s the in-built weakness that needs to be created in the software that would otherwise deem every bit of tech we use to live these days unsafe or faulty.

Every Aussie would be at risk of pretty catastrophic attacks so that we can possibly stop something nasty happening


#4779

Plus, our tech industry would be wiped from global sales


#4780

Good boots-on-the-ground police work and cultivation of human informers?

This is a cost-benefit balance thing. The benefit is that it’ll be somewhat easier for police to tap criminals communications. The cost is that every single digital communication in Australia will be rendered insecure, that big parts of the Australian tech industry will be wiped out, and that bad actors in dozens of law enforcement bodies (or quasi-law enforcement bodies like the RSPCA) will have basically unfettered access to every communication in Australia.

And frankly, if I’m a moderately tech-aware crook, if this legislation passes, I’m just going to fly to NZ, buy my new phone/download a clean OS & apps, and then get on with business.


#4781

It’s dumb but conniving nat security relying on dumb but conniving pollies relying on criminals and terrorists to be dumb when it’s their job to be the most conniving, and everyone expecting the voting public to keep dumb. Pretty clever when you think about it, which they expect you won’t.


#4782

When did you change jobs?


#4783

Why would you suppose a Gov employee, munted or o/wise would have anything to do with it?

Surely it’s the coders of the app that make any so termed “Back Door” into their own software. Shitt like this takes years and millions to develop, they certainly aren’t going to hand it over to someone else to fk with.


#4784

Telecommunications interceptions are boots on the ground police work.